son to claim that as he was a Prince of the country he should take precedence over his father.

After almost eighteen years of service, Prince Albert was not allowed to accept the title of Prince Consort without a sarcastic comment in The Times. His own announcement to his brother showed no pleasure. "I am to have the title Prince Consort of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland," he wrote. "This ought to have been done, as you thought yourself, at our wedding. " 5

There had been another domestic rejoicing, in April, when Princess Beatrice was born. She was the last of the big family, at a time of big families. (The population of England, Scotland, and Wales rose from 17 millions to 23 millions between 1841 and 1861.) In July, Prince Albert crossed to Belgium for the wedding of the Archduke Maximilian to King Leopold's daughter, Princess Charlotte. Queen Victoria was at Osborne and she ordered wine for the servants and grog for the sailors on her yacht to celebrate the day. "At this very moment," she wrote to King Leopold, the "knot is being tied which binds your sweet loving child to a thoroughly worthy husband." Six years later the "sweet loving child" and the "thoroughly worthy husband" became Empress and Emperor of Mexico — a rash enterprise that was to end in madness and assassination.


{62}

1857-1858

WHILE Queen Victoria was pinning medals on the tunics of the Crimean heroes, in May, news came of mutiny among the Indian regiments at Meerut. English officers, women, and children had been massacred and the rebels had retreated to Delhi to gather more supporters. News of the cruelty of the Sepoys and of the death of General Anson, Commander-in-Chief in India, reached England, and the government had to turn its attention from a victory to a new source of disaster. Once more the impetus came from the Court. The Queen complained, "If we had not reduced in such a hurry this spring, we should now have all the men wanted." The Prince Consort wrote, "The Ministry [is] too calm for my notions. We are constantly digging our spurs into their sides." Lord Clarendon admitted, "We are utterly defenceless." In one month, 30,000 native troops had disappeared from the army in northern India. While the ghastly story moved on to massacre at

-151-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Reign of Queen Victoria
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • The Reign of Queen Victoria *
  • Acknowledgments *
  • Illustrations *
  • Foreword *
  • {1} i
  • {2} 2
  • {3} 4
  • {4} 10
  • {5} 11
  • {6} 14
  • {7} 17
  • {8} 21
  • {9} 23
  • {10} 25
  • {11} 29
  • {12} 30
  • {13} 32
  • {14} 34
  • {15} 37
  • {16} 39
  • {17} 42
  • {18} 44
  • {19} 49
  • {20} 53
  • {21} 54
  • {22} 55
  • {23} 57
  • {24} 60
  • {25} 63
  • {26} 65
  • {27} 67
  • {28} 70
  • {29} 76
  • {30} 79
  • {31} 80
  • {32} 84
  • {33} 87
  • {34} 91
  • {35} 93
  • {36} 103
  • {37} 106
  • {38} 109
  • {39} 110
  • {40} 111
  • {41} 115
  • {42} 116
  • {43} 116
  • {44} 118
  • {45} 119
  • {46} 121
  • {47} 123
  • {48} 124
  • {49} 125
  • {50} 127
  • {51} 128
  • {52} 129
  • {53} 134
  • {54} 136
  • {55} 138
  • {56} 140
  • {57} 141
  • {58} 144
  • {59} 145
  • {60} 146
  • {61} 149
  • {62} 151
  • {63} 153
  • {64} 154
  • {65} 157
  • {66} 158
  • {67} 161
  • {68} 163
  • {69} 165
  • {70} 168
  • {71} 169
  • {72} 172
  • {73} 172
  • {74} 176
  • {75} 178
  • {76} 180
  • {77} 182
  • {78} 185
  • {79} 187
  • {80} 190
  • {81} 194
  • {82} 196
  • {83} 199
  • {84} 204
  • {85} 206
  • {86} 213
  • {87} 216
  • {88} 218
  • {89} 221
  • {90} 224
  • {91} 228
  • {92} 230
  • {93} 231
  • {94} 235
  • {95} 237
  • {96} 239
  • {97} 243
  • {98} 245
  • {99} 252
  • {100} 256
  • {101} 260
  • {102} 262
  • {103} 265
  • {104} 266
  • {105} 267
  • {106} 268
  • {107} 271
  • {108} 272
  • {109} 274
  • {110} 276
  • {111} 278
  • {112} 280
  • {113} 283
  • {114} 285
  • {115} 289
  • {116} 292
  • {117} 296
  • {118} 299
  • {119} 300
  • {120} 301
  • {121} 304
  • {122} 306
  • {123} 310
  • {124} 312
  • {125} 314
  • {126} 315
  • {127} 317
  • {128} 320
  • {129} 322
  • {130} 323
  • {131} 324
  • {132} 326
  • {133} 327
  • {134} 330
  • {135} 331
  • {136} 333
  • {137} 335
  • {138} 338
  • {139} 340
  • {140} 343
  • {141} 346
  • {142} 346
  • {143} 348
  • {144} 349
  • {145} 352
  • {146} 353
  • {147} 356
  • {148} 358
  • {149} 360
  • {150} 361
  • {151} 363
  • {152} 366
  • {153} 369
  • {154} 372
  • {155} 375
  • {156} 377
  • {157} 379
  • Sources and References 383
  • Bibliography 405
  • {Index} 407
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 437

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.