{70}

1859-1860

BEFORE he went to Oxford, the Prince of Wales had spent the summer and autumn of 1859 at Edinburgh, studying applied science. Sir Sidney Lee recalls one incident from this period of instruction which reveals the earnestness with which the Prince was taught.

"Has your Highness any faith in science?" asked a professor.

"Certainly," replied the Prince.

They were standing near a cauldron of lead, boiling at white heat. The professor then washed the Prince's hand with ammonia and invited him to put his hand into the cauldron and ladle out some of the boiling metal.

The Prince asked, "Do you tell me to do this?" and the professor said, "I do. "

The Prince "instantly put his hand into the cauldron and ladled out some of the boiling metal."

Sir James Clark, the Court physician, who had survived in favour from the days of the affair of Lady Flora Hastings, had warned1 one of the Edinburgh professors that he would find the Prince "very backward for his age." But the professor thought that "the Prince's powers of application" were underrated and that both his "disposition and capacity" promised well.

Thus armed, and approved, the Prince of Wales had gone to Oxford in October, 1859. It said something for the will of the University that when the Prince Consort wished his son to belong "to the whole University" and not to one "particular college," the Dean of Christ Church said he did not think it would be allowed. It is recorded that the only other heir to the throne who had been an Oxford student was Prince Hal who, in his time, was also devoted to silken dalliance. But when the hour came, Henry V was well fitted for the hazards and splendour of war. If only the Prince of Wales had read his history with a little imagination he might have felt more hopeful about his own future.

The Prince was haunted by his father's opinion that "the only use of Oxford is that it is a place for study." Pleasure and instruction were not to go hand in hand. The Prince was not allowed to live in college

-168-

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Reign of Queen Victoria
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • The Reign of Queen Victoria *
  • Acknowledgments *
  • Illustrations *
  • Foreword *
  • {1} i
  • {2} 2
  • {3} 4
  • {4} 10
  • {5} 11
  • {6} 14
  • {7} 17
  • {8} 21
  • {9} 23
  • {10} 25
  • {11} 29
  • {12} 30
  • {13} 32
  • {14} 34
  • {15} 37
  • {16} 39
  • {17} 42
  • {18} 44
  • {19} 49
  • {20} 53
  • {21} 54
  • {22} 55
  • {23} 57
  • {24} 60
  • {25} 63
  • {26} 65
  • {27} 67
  • {28} 70
  • {29} 76
  • {30} 79
  • {31} 80
  • {32} 84
  • {33} 87
  • {34} 91
  • {35} 93
  • {36} 103
  • {37} 106
  • {38} 109
  • {39} 110
  • {40} 111
  • {41} 115
  • {42} 116
  • {43} 116
  • {44} 118
  • {45} 119
  • {46} 121
  • {47} 123
  • {48} 124
  • {49} 125
  • {50} 127
  • {51} 128
  • {52} 129
  • {53} 134
  • {54} 136
  • {55} 138
  • {56} 140
  • {57} 141
  • {58} 144
  • {59} 145
  • {60} 146
  • {61} 149
  • {62} 151
  • {63} 153
  • {64} 154
  • {65} 157
  • {66} 158
  • {67} 161
  • {68} 163
  • {69} 165
  • {70} 168
  • {71} 169
  • {72} 172
  • {73} 172
  • {74} 176
  • {75} 178
  • {76} 180
  • {77} 182
  • {78} 185
  • {79} 187
  • {80} 190
  • {81} 194
  • {82} 196
  • {83} 199
  • {84} 204
  • {85} 206
  • {86} 213
  • {87} 216
  • {88} 218
  • {89} 221
  • {90} 224
  • {91} 228
  • {92} 230
  • {93} 231
  • {94} 235
  • {95} 237
  • {96} 239
  • {97} 243
  • {98} 245
  • {99} 252
  • {100} 256
  • {101} 260
  • {102} 262
  • {103} 265
  • {104} 266
  • {105} 267
  • {106} 268
  • {107} 271
  • {108} 272
  • {109} 274
  • {110} 276
  • {111} 278
  • {112} 280
  • {113} 283
  • {114} 285
  • {115} 289
  • {116} 292
  • {117} 296
  • {118} 299
  • {119} 300
  • {120} 301
  • {121} 304
  • {122} 306
  • {123} 310
  • {124} 312
  • {125} 314
  • {126} 315
  • {127} 317
  • {128} 320
  • {129} 322
  • {130} 323
  • {131} 324
  • {132} 326
  • {133} 327
  • {134} 330
  • {135} 331
  • {136} 333
  • {137} 335
  • {138} 338
  • {139} 340
  • {140} 343
  • {141} 346
  • {142} 346
  • {143} 348
  • {144} 349
  • {145} 352
  • {146} 353
  • {147} 356
  • {148} 358
  • {149} 360
  • {150} 361
  • {151} 363
  • {152} 366
  • {153} 369
  • {154} 372
  • {155} 375
  • {156} 377
  • {157} 379
  • Sources and References 383
  • Bibliography 405
  • {Index} 407
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