friendliness which was the root of his success. The Governor of Maine came on board H. M. S. Hero, to say good-bye. "Will you take a little wine, or is the Maine law in force here?" asked the Prince. The Governor answered, "I am out of my jurisdiction and will take the consequences."

The Prince of Wales sailed for England on October 20, five months before the outbreak of the Civil War.

While H. M. S. Hero was crossing the Atlantic, Victor Emmanuel and Garibaldi met on the line of the Volturno. Garibaldi shouted, "Viva Victor Emmanuel, " and, "in a voice trembling with emotion," he added, "King of Italy." The King gave his hand to Garibaldi and, "with equal emotion," said, "I thank you. "

The Prince's brother had arrived home before him, with his own tale of conquest. Sir George Grey, Governor of Cape Colony, had written, "Nothing can be more gratifying than everything connected with Prince Alfred's journeys here. He is a noble young fellow, full of life and fun."


{77}

1860

WHILE in New York the Prince of Wales had met many rich and fashionable Americans who became members of the Edwardian society he preferred in the later years of his freedom. He had liked the tempo of New York life, and the surfeit of "babble and revel and wine" of which he was allowed so little at home. But, within a few days of his return to England he was back at Oxford and writing to his mother, "I have been attending all my lectures very regularly this week."

The Prince Consort still thought his son should be kept out of the "vortex of society," which had changed out of recognition since 1836 when, as a sleepy young pedant, he had stayed at Kensington Palace. Coaches no longer whirled down to Brighton with dissolute dandies on the box seats. Trains now brought the increased mass of well-to‐ do people to and from London. They came up to see the latest pictures at the Academy; they imported their brocades from the continent, bought their dresses in Paris, and loaded their occasional tables with books, bound in watered silk, inscribed by poets whose edifying verses might be read by any child.

-182-

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Reign of Queen Victoria
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • The Reign of Queen Victoria *
  • Acknowledgments *
  • Illustrations *
  • Foreword *
  • {1} i
  • {2} 2
  • {3} 4
  • {4} 10
  • {5} 11
  • {6} 14
  • {7} 17
  • {8} 21
  • {9} 23
  • {10} 25
  • {11} 29
  • {12} 30
  • {13} 32
  • {14} 34
  • {15} 37
  • {16} 39
  • {17} 42
  • {18} 44
  • {19} 49
  • {20} 53
  • {21} 54
  • {22} 55
  • {23} 57
  • {24} 60
  • {25} 63
  • {26} 65
  • {27} 67
  • {28} 70
  • {29} 76
  • {30} 79
  • {31} 80
  • {32} 84
  • {33} 87
  • {34} 91
  • {35} 93
  • {36} 103
  • {37} 106
  • {38} 109
  • {39} 110
  • {40} 111
  • {41} 115
  • {42} 116
  • {43} 116
  • {44} 118
  • {45} 119
  • {46} 121
  • {47} 123
  • {48} 124
  • {49} 125
  • {50} 127
  • {51} 128
  • {52} 129
  • {53} 134
  • {54} 136
  • {55} 138
  • {56} 140
  • {57} 141
  • {58} 144
  • {59} 145
  • {60} 146
  • {61} 149
  • {62} 151
  • {63} 153
  • {64} 154
  • {65} 157
  • {66} 158
  • {67} 161
  • {68} 163
  • {69} 165
  • {70} 168
  • {71} 169
  • {72} 172
  • {73} 172
  • {74} 176
  • {75} 178
  • {76} 180
  • {77} 182
  • {78} 185
  • {79} 187
  • {80} 190
  • {81} 194
  • {82} 196
  • {83} 199
  • {84} 204
  • {85} 206
  • {86} 213
  • {87} 216
  • {88} 218
  • {89} 221
  • {90} 224
  • {91} 228
  • {92} 230
  • {93} 231
  • {94} 235
  • {95} 237
  • {96} 239
  • {97} 243
  • {98} 245
  • {99} 252
  • {100} 256
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  • {103} 265
  • {104} 266
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  • {106} 268
  • {107} 271
  • {108} 272
  • {109} 274
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  • {111} 278
  • {112} 280
  • {113} 283
  • {114} 285
  • {115} 289
  • {116} 292
  • {117} 296
  • {118} 299
  • {119} 300
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  • {121} 304
  • {122} 306
  • {123} 310
  • {124} 312
  • {125} 314
  • {126} 315
  • {127} 317
  • {128} 320
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  • {132} 326
  • {133} 327
  • {134} 330
  • {135} 331
  • {136} 333
  • {137} 335
  • {138} 338
  • {139} 340
  • {140} 343
  • {141} 346
  • {142} 346
  • {143} 348
  • {144} 349
  • {145} 352
  • {146} 353
  • {147} 356
  • {148} 358
  • {149} 360
  • {150} 361
  • {151} 363
  • {152} 366
  • {153} 369
  • {154} 372
  • {155} 375
  • {156} 377
  • {157} 379
  • Sources and References 383
  • Bibliography 405
  • {Index} 407
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