be swayed to and fro on all sides . . . they were told beforehand what they would have to expect . . . as rivers of blood had flowed, and the sword decided this contest, the victor must make his own terms and they must be hard ones for many. ... We have made enormous sacrifices, and the nation expects them not to be in vain. I fear this is all the answer I can give you at present...."

The horizon of the Crown Princess's prospects in the world had extended. When her betrothal was announced in 1855, The Times had belittled the "paltry German dynasty" into which she was to marry. The Crown Princess was now on the steps of a throne which might some day compete with that of her mother for the prizes of power.


{95}

1866-1867

THE Queen's political heaven was to become less confused during the last half of her reign. Instead of the bewildering constellations of the early years, she was able to enjoy the simple division of night from day. The darkness was whenever Mr. Gladstone came into power; the dawn, when Mr. Disraeli and then Lord Salisbury were at her side. For thirty-two years she was to have only three Prime Ministers, Disraeli, Gladstone, and Lord Salisbury, except for the brief interlude when Lord Rosebery was in power, from 1894 to 1895.

There were no half shades in Queen Victoria's likes and dislikes and, as the years passed, she was encouraged in her devotion to Mr. Disraeli by many of her friends, just as they were equally encouraging in her unreasonable dislike for Mr. Gladstone. Gladstone did not "fit in" when he was at Windsor, lunching with the Queen's ladies and gentlemen and embarrassing them by mumbling prayers at table. At first they liked him. "And oh! What a charming voice," Lady Augusta Stanley commented. But when she met him in Rome, she concluded that he had "no possible understanding of a joke" and that this was "the hitch and the cause of his failing to reap all the benefit he might from his immense talents. "1 The change in esteem for Disraeli was equally rapid and the Court soon forgot that the Prince Consort had said

"the Jew had not one single element of a gentleman in his composition."

During the two years of Lord Derby's ministry, before Mr. Disraeli

-237-

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Reign of Queen Victoria
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • The Reign of Queen Victoria *
  • Acknowledgments *
  • Illustrations *
  • Foreword *
  • {1} i
  • {2} 2
  • {3} 4
  • {4} 10
  • {5} 11
  • {6} 14
  • {7} 17
  • {8} 21
  • {9} 23
  • {10} 25
  • {11} 29
  • {12} 30
  • {13} 32
  • {14} 34
  • {15} 37
  • {16} 39
  • {17} 42
  • {18} 44
  • {19} 49
  • {20} 53
  • {21} 54
  • {22} 55
  • {23} 57
  • {24} 60
  • {25} 63
  • {26} 65
  • {27} 67
  • {28} 70
  • {29} 76
  • {30} 79
  • {31} 80
  • {32} 84
  • {33} 87
  • {34} 91
  • {35} 93
  • {36} 103
  • {37} 106
  • {38} 109
  • {39} 110
  • {40} 111
  • {41} 115
  • {42} 116
  • {43} 116
  • {44} 118
  • {45} 119
  • {46} 121
  • {47} 123
  • {48} 124
  • {49} 125
  • {50} 127
  • {51} 128
  • {52} 129
  • {53} 134
  • {54} 136
  • {55} 138
  • {56} 140
  • {57} 141
  • {58} 144
  • {59} 145
  • {60} 146
  • {61} 149
  • {62} 151
  • {63} 153
  • {64} 154
  • {65} 157
  • {66} 158
  • {67} 161
  • {68} 163
  • {69} 165
  • {70} 168
  • {71} 169
  • {72} 172
  • {73} 172
  • {74} 176
  • {75} 178
  • {76} 180
  • {77} 182
  • {78} 185
  • {79} 187
  • {80} 190
  • {81} 194
  • {82} 196
  • {83} 199
  • {84} 204
  • {85} 206
  • {86} 213
  • {87} 216
  • {88} 218
  • {89} 221
  • {90} 224
  • {91} 228
  • {92} 230
  • {93} 231
  • {94} 235
  • {95} 237
  • {96} 239
  • {97} 243
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  • {99} 252
  • {100} 256
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  • {103} 265
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  • {106} 268
  • {107} 271
  • {108} 272
  • {109} 274
  • {110} 276
  • {111} 278
  • {112} 280
  • {113} 283
  • {114} 285
  • {115} 289
  • {116} 292
  • {117} 296
  • {118} 299
  • {119} 300
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  • {121} 304
  • {122} 306
  • {123} 310
  • {124} 312
  • {125} 314
  • {126} 315
  • {127} 317
  • {128} 320
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  • {132} 326
  • {133} 327
  • {134} 330
  • {135} 331
  • {136} 333
  • {137} 335
  • {138} 338
  • {139} 340
  • {140} 343
  • {141} 346
  • {142} 346
  • {143} 348
  • {144} 349
  • {145} 352
  • {146} 353
  • {147} 356
  • {148} 358
  • {149} 360
  • {150} 361
  • {151} 363
  • {152} 366
  • {153} 369
  • {154} 372
  • {155} 375
  • {156} 377
  • {157} 379
  • Sources and References 383
  • Bibliography 405
  • {Index} 407
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