was already strong in him. He was his grandfather's heir as to character, without his scholarship. But in these early years there was enough young impishness to keep him human. A couple of marlinespikes found their way into the bunk of an officer and a certain cadet was blamed. Prince George admitted he was the culprit and his leave was stopped for a week.

From the Britannia Prince George and his elder brother went to the Bacchante, in which they toured some of their grandmother's empire. There was no hint that Prince Albert Victor would die; so Prince George enjoyed the advantages of being trained as a second son, without the prospect of a crown. A sailor's life suited him; his character, humour and tastes thrived in a wardroom or officers' mess. One evening he wrote in his journal,

"After dinner much amusement, trying to sit on an empty corked bottle, on the deck, at the same time holding a candle in each hand, one of which was lighted, the other to be lighted from it, without rolling over."

While he was in Australia, Prince George stayed with a hostess who placed a wreath of rosebuds about his breakfast plate. He was told they were "for Sunday morning and in memory of England." The incident was prophetic, for the Prince was to become the first real father of the Empire. The weakening bonds between the Royal family and Europe were to be finally shattered by Prince George, who, in later years, expressed his feelings for the Germans, after a course in Heidelberg, by saying he regretted the time he had wasted, " learning their beastly language."

Lord Beaconsfield read the reports on the colonial journeys with imagination.

"It is wise that the fountains of honour should flow freely in the colonies,"
he wrote to Queen Victoria. One of his last suggestions as Prime Minister was that Princess Louise and her husband, the Marquess of Lorne, should go to Government House in Canada; the first time an English Princess was appointed to responsibility in the new world.


{116}

1879-1880

TOWARDS the end of November, 1879, Mr. Gladstone began his " pilgrimage of passion" through Midlothian. Lord Morley claimed in

-292-

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Reign of Queen Victoria
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • The Reign of Queen Victoria *
  • Acknowledgments *
  • Illustrations *
  • Foreword *
  • {1} i
  • {2} 2
  • {3} 4
  • {4} 10
  • {5} 11
  • {6} 14
  • {7} 17
  • {8} 21
  • {9} 23
  • {10} 25
  • {11} 29
  • {12} 30
  • {13} 32
  • {14} 34
  • {15} 37
  • {16} 39
  • {17} 42
  • {18} 44
  • {19} 49
  • {20} 53
  • {21} 54
  • {22} 55
  • {23} 57
  • {24} 60
  • {25} 63
  • {26} 65
  • {27} 67
  • {28} 70
  • {29} 76
  • {30} 79
  • {31} 80
  • {32} 84
  • {33} 87
  • {34} 91
  • {35} 93
  • {36} 103
  • {37} 106
  • {38} 109
  • {39} 110
  • {40} 111
  • {41} 115
  • {42} 116
  • {43} 116
  • {44} 118
  • {45} 119
  • {46} 121
  • {47} 123
  • {48} 124
  • {49} 125
  • {50} 127
  • {51} 128
  • {52} 129
  • {53} 134
  • {54} 136
  • {55} 138
  • {56} 140
  • {57} 141
  • {58} 144
  • {59} 145
  • {60} 146
  • {61} 149
  • {62} 151
  • {63} 153
  • {64} 154
  • {65} 157
  • {66} 158
  • {67} 161
  • {68} 163
  • {69} 165
  • {70} 168
  • {71} 169
  • {72} 172
  • {73} 172
  • {74} 176
  • {75} 178
  • {76} 180
  • {77} 182
  • {78} 185
  • {79} 187
  • {80} 190
  • {81} 194
  • {82} 196
  • {83} 199
  • {84} 204
  • {85} 206
  • {86} 213
  • {87} 216
  • {88} 218
  • {89} 221
  • {90} 224
  • {91} 228
  • {92} 230
  • {93} 231
  • {94} 235
  • {95} 237
  • {96} 239
  • {97} 243
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  • {99} 252
  • {100} 256
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  • {103} 265
  • {104} 266
  • {105} 267
  • {106} 268
  • {107} 271
  • {108} 272
  • {109} 274
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  • {111} 278
  • {112} 280
  • {113} 283
  • {114} 285
  • {115} 289
  • {116} 292
  • {117} 296
  • {118} 299
  • {119} 300
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  • {121} 304
  • {122} 306
  • {123} 310
  • {124} 312
  • {125} 314
  • {126} 315
  • {127} 317
  • {128} 320
  • {129} 322
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  • {131} 324
  • {132} 326
  • {133} 327
  • {134} 330
  • {135} 331
  • {136} 333
  • {137} 335
  • {138} 338
  • {139} 340
  • {140} 343
  • {141} 346
  • {142} 346
  • {143} 348
  • {144} 349
  • {145} 352
  • {146} 353
  • {147} 356
  • {148} 358
  • {149} 360
  • {150} 361
  • {151} 363
  • {152} 366
  • {153} 369
  • {154} 372
  • {155} 375
  • {156} 377
  • {157} 379
  • Sources and References 383
  • Bibliography 405
  • {Index} 407
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