tion," and Lord Granville wrote,

'Your Majesty must feel proud. "
5 She admitted in her journal,
"I certainly am."

The Lords passed the Franchise Bill on December 6. The day before, the Prince of Wales had written to Lord Wolseley,

" Parliament is up and we shall be able to go to our homes and digest our Christmas dinners in peace and comfort."

For the Queen, the prospect was dark. She wrote that she looked forward to the opening of a new year with " disquiet. " 6


{126}

1884-1885

THE year 1884 had been one of solemn reckoning for the country and for the Queen. Trade had suffered and the Liberal government had proved that empires cannot be held together with magnanimity alone. Complications in Europe had proved that greed, jealousy, and cynicism were as much part of relationship between nations as between human beings. Queen Victoria, who had made so few friends, was beginning to find faults in even the Empress Augusta and had to warn Sir Howard Elphinstone to be wary of her, as she was

"filled with spite and unchristian feelings"
and was
"very unkind towards the Crown Princess. "
1 The fantastic old Empress, with her enamelled face, looking
"almost like a resurrected corpse,"
except for her eyes that glittered
"as if they had little torches behind them,"
2 was no longer the beloved, trusted friend. She wrote
"stiff and not very amiable letters"
to the Queen.3

Queen Victoria wrote, on December 27,

"The Queen is fairly well and her powers of walking and standing are decidedly greatly improved. But her spirits are gone! She may appear for moments gay, but deep down in her heart there are unhealed wounds which will remain so while life here lasts. ... She cannot get over what she has gone through these last 2 years. . . ."
4

There were compensations for the hazards of politics in the relationship between the Queen and her family; as she learned and acknowledged their right to lives of their own. In 1872, she had said to Lady Augusta Stanley that

"no married daughter"
was
"of any use."
Her fourth daughter was now at Government House, in Canada, being of great "use." The Queen had also said to Lady Augusta that

-315-

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Reign of Queen Victoria
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • The Reign of Queen Victoria *
  • Acknowledgments *
  • Illustrations *
  • Foreword *
  • {1} i
  • {2} 2
  • {3} 4
  • {4} 10
  • {5} 11
  • {6} 14
  • {7} 17
  • {8} 21
  • {9} 23
  • {10} 25
  • {11} 29
  • {12} 30
  • {13} 32
  • {14} 34
  • {15} 37
  • {16} 39
  • {17} 42
  • {18} 44
  • {19} 49
  • {20} 53
  • {21} 54
  • {22} 55
  • {23} 57
  • {24} 60
  • {25} 63
  • {26} 65
  • {27} 67
  • {28} 70
  • {29} 76
  • {30} 79
  • {31} 80
  • {32} 84
  • {33} 87
  • {34} 91
  • {35} 93
  • {36} 103
  • {37} 106
  • {38} 109
  • {39} 110
  • {40} 111
  • {41} 115
  • {42} 116
  • {43} 116
  • {44} 118
  • {45} 119
  • {46} 121
  • {47} 123
  • {48} 124
  • {49} 125
  • {50} 127
  • {51} 128
  • {52} 129
  • {53} 134
  • {54} 136
  • {55} 138
  • {56} 140
  • {57} 141
  • {58} 144
  • {59} 145
  • {60} 146
  • {61} 149
  • {62} 151
  • {63} 153
  • {64} 154
  • {65} 157
  • {66} 158
  • {67} 161
  • {68} 163
  • {69} 165
  • {70} 168
  • {71} 169
  • {72} 172
  • {73} 172
  • {74} 176
  • {75} 178
  • {76} 180
  • {77} 182
  • {78} 185
  • {79} 187
  • {80} 190
  • {81} 194
  • {82} 196
  • {83} 199
  • {84} 204
  • {85} 206
  • {86} 213
  • {87} 216
  • {88} 218
  • {89} 221
  • {90} 224
  • {91} 228
  • {92} 230
  • {93} 231
  • {94} 235
  • {95} 237
  • {96} 239
  • {97} 243
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  • {99} 252
  • {100} 256
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  • {103} 265
  • {104} 266
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  • {106} 268
  • {107} 271
  • {108} 272
  • {109} 274
  • {110} 276
  • {111} 278
  • {112} 280
  • {113} 283
  • {114} 285
  • {115} 289
  • {116} 292
  • {117} 296
  • {118} 299
  • {119} 300
  • {120} 301
  • {121} 304
  • {122} 306
  • {123} 310
  • {124} 312
  • {125} 314
  • {126} 315
  • {127} 317
  • {128} 320
  • {129} 322
  • {130} 323
  • {131} 324
  • {132} 326
  • {133} 327
  • {134} 330
  • {135} 331
  • {136} 333
  • {137} 335
  • {138} 338
  • {139} 340
  • {140} 343
  • {141} 346
  • {142} 346
  • {143} 348
  • {144} 349
  • {145} 352
  • {146} 353
  • {147} 356
  • {148} 358
  • {149} 360
  • {150} 361
  • {151} 363
  • {152} 366
  • {153} 369
  • {154} 372
  • {155} 375
  • {156} 377
  • {157} 379
  • Sources and References 383
  • Bibliography 405
  • {Index} 407
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