ding, She had to be "rolled" in her chair, "to see from the window all that was going on." 2 While the Queen was still lying in bed, on the wedding day, she heard "the distant hum of the people." In her journal she noted every detail; her dress, made from her "wedding lace over a light black stuff," and her "wedding veil surmounted by a small coronet." The bride wore a "simple" dress, of "white satin with a silver design of roses, shamrocks, thistles and orange flowers interwoven," with "a small wreath of orange flowers, myrtle, and white heather," surmounted by a diamond diadem.

The Queen did not complain because, through some hitch, she arrived at the chapel too early.

"I was the first to arrive . . . which was not intended, but which I was glad of, as I saw all the processions, which were very striking and dignified."

As the Queen watched the bride and bridegroom, with ten bridesmaids behind them, she could not help remembering that they were standing where she had stood " fifty-three years ago," and where "dear Vicky" had stood " thirty-five years ago." The Queen wrote,

"May these dear children's happiness last longer!"

The Queen returned to Buckingham Palace "before everyone else," and although the "heat was very great, quite overpowering," she went to the balcony on which she had stood with Prince Albert to see the soldiers leaving for the Crimea, in 1854. The little figure appeared alone, and there was "much cheering." Then the bride and bridegroom came and the Queen came out again, holding Princess Mary's hand. There was "another great outburst of cheering."

There was no hint of tiredness; no rest for the busy eyes that noted the bride's travelling dress of "white poplin, edged with gold," and her "pretty little toque with roses." The Queen stayed until the end, to wish "the young couple affectionately good-bye. "


{144}

1893-1894

THE last considerable conflict between Queen Victoria and Mr. Gladstone began in January, 1893, when the Prime Minister sent her the draft of her speech for the opening of Parliament. The Home Rule Bill for Ireland was to emerge again and the Queen objected to using the word "better."

"I cannot say that the measure will be for the better government of Ireland. Can you leave out 'better'? "

-349-

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Reign of Queen Victoria
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • The Reign of Queen Victoria *
  • Acknowledgments *
  • Illustrations *
  • Foreword *
  • {1} i
  • {2} 2
  • {3} 4
  • {4} 10
  • {5} 11
  • {6} 14
  • {7} 17
  • {8} 21
  • {9} 23
  • {10} 25
  • {11} 29
  • {12} 30
  • {13} 32
  • {14} 34
  • {15} 37
  • {16} 39
  • {17} 42
  • {18} 44
  • {19} 49
  • {20} 53
  • {21} 54
  • {22} 55
  • {23} 57
  • {24} 60
  • {25} 63
  • {26} 65
  • {27} 67
  • {28} 70
  • {29} 76
  • {30} 79
  • {31} 80
  • {32} 84
  • {33} 87
  • {34} 91
  • {35} 93
  • {36} 103
  • {37} 106
  • {38} 109
  • {39} 110
  • {40} 111
  • {41} 115
  • {42} 116
  • {43} 116
  • {44} 118
  • {45} 119
  • {46} 121
  • {47} 123
  • {48} 124
  • {49} 125
  • {50} 127
  • {51} 128
  • {52} 129
  • {53} 134
  • {54} 136
  • {55} 138
  • {56} 140
  • {57} 141
  • {58} 144
  • {59} 145
  • {60} 146
  • {61} 149
  • {62} 151
  • {63} 153
  • {64} 154
  • {65} 157
  • {66} 158
  • {67} 161
  • {68} 163
  • {69} 165
  • {70} 168
  • {71} 169
  • {72} 172
  • {73} 172
  • {74} 176
  • {75} 178
  • {76} 180
  • {77} 182
  • {78} 185
  • {79} 187
  • {80} 190
  • {81} 194
  • {82} 196
  • {83} 199
  • {84} 204
  • {85} 206
  • {86} 213
  • {87} 216
  • {88} 218
  • {89} 221
  • {90} 224
  • {91} 228
  • {92} 230
  • {93} 231
  • {94} 235
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  • {96} 239
  • {97} 243
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  • {99} 252
  • {100} 256
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  • {103} 265
  • {104} 266
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  • {106} 268
  • {107} 271
  • {108} 272
  • {109} 274
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  • {111} 278
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  • {113} 283
  • {114} 285
  • {115} 289
  • {116} 292
  • {117} 296
  • {118} 299
  • {119} 300
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  • {121} 304
  • {122} 306
  • {123} 310
  • {124} 312
  • {125} 314
  • {126} 315
  • {127} 317
  • {128} 320
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  • {132} 326
  • {133} 327
  • {134} 330
  • {135} 331
  • {136} 333
  • {137} 335
  • {138} 338
  • {139} 340
  • {140} 343
  • {141} 346
  • {142} 346
  • {143} 348
  • {144} 349
  • {145} 352
  • {146} 353
  • {147} 356
  • {148} 358
  • {149} 360
  • {150} 361
  • {151} 363
  • {152} 366
  • {153} 369
  • {154} 372
  • {155} 375
  • {156} 377
  • {157} 379
  • Sources and References 383
  • Bibliography 405
  • {Index} 407
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