1861, she used to sit with "dearest Albert and look through dear Mama's letters." The Queen wrote,

" ... we were photographed, I, holding the baby on my lap, Bertie and Georgie standing behind me, thus making the four generations."

The Prince was named Edward, with the addition of George for England, Andrew for Scotland, Patrick for Ireland, and David for Wales. When he was old enough the Prince was taken every now and then to see his great-grandmother, in London or at Windsor. Her eyes were so weary that she saw him dimly, but she was happy with him playing at her feet, and especially pleased one day when he proved that gallantry was one of his virtues. While the little Grand Duchess Olga of Russia was playing with him she lost her balance and fell. "David" helped her to her feet and kissed her.

Her grandchildren 2 never forgot the awe with which they approached the Queen: the long passages and succession of rooms through which they walked, with religious quiet, until they came into the presence of the little figure, wearing a black silk dress and white cap. All the authority in the world seemed to emanate from the tired, aged Sovereign, seated near the hundred little objects — photographs and miniature busts, souvenirs and baubles — which belonged to her time. They remembered also the strange little copper oven in which her new secretary dried 3 his memoranda for the Queen. He used special broad nibs and when his notes were finished he placed them in the oven so that the ink would still be black and readable, and not dimmed by blotting.

The grandchildren remembered also the coldness of the rooms in which the Queen received them. There must be an hundred phrases, in her journal and letters, complaining of "the heat." It was part of her vigorous discipline that she never sat near a fire, and was shocked when she found any of her ladies toasting their toes, with the windows closed. When ladies went to stay with the Queen, in winter or summer, they usually packed their shawls.


{146}

1894-1895

WHEN the Queen asked Lord Rosebery to be Prime Minister, "if even only for a short time," he was unwilling. He wrote that he set

"the greatest value on the character of his relations"

-353-

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Reign of Queen Victoria
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • The Reign of Queen Victoria *
  • Acknowledgments *
  • Illustrations *
  • Foreword *
  • {1} i
  • {2} 2
  • {3} 4
  • {4} 10
  • {5} 11
  • {6} 14
  • {7} 17
  • {8} 21
  • {9} 23
  • {10} 25
  • {11} 29
  • {12} 30
  • {13} 32
  • {14} 34
  • {15} 37
  • {16} 39
  • {17} 42
  • {18} 44
  • {19} 49
  • {20} 53
  • {21} 54
  • {22} 55
  • {23} 57
  • {24} 60
  • {25} 63
  • {26} 65
  • {27} 67
  • {28} 70
  • {29} 76
  • {30} 79
  • {31} 80
  • {32} 84
  • {33} 87
  • {34} 91
  • {35} 93
  • {36} 103
  • {37} 106
  • {38} 109
  • {39} 110
  • {40} 111
  • {41} 115
  • {42} 116
  • {43} 116
  • {44} 118
  • {45} 119
  • {46} 121
  • {47} 123
  • {48} 124
  • {49} 125
  • {50} 127
  • {51} 128
  • {52} 129
  • {53} 134
  • {54} 136
  • {55} 138
  • {56} 140
  • {57} 141
  • {58} 144
  • {59} 145
  • {60} 146
  • {61} 149
  • {62} 151
  • {63} 153
  • {64} 154
  • {65} 157
  • {66} 158
  • {67} 161
  • {68} 163
  • {69} 165
  • {70} 168
  • {71} 169
  • {72} 172
  • {73} 172
  • {74} 176
  • {75} 178
  • {76} 180
  • {77} 182
  • {78} 185
  • {79} 187
  • {80} 190
  • {81} 194
  • {82} 196
  • {83} 199
  • {84} 204
  • {85} 206
  • {86} 213
  • {87} 216
  • {88} 218
  • {89} 221
  • {90} 224
  • {91} 228
  • {92} 230
  • {93} 231
  • {94} 235
  • {95} 237
  • {96} 239
  • {97} 243
  • {98} 245
  • {99} 252
  • {100} 256
  • {101} 260
  • {102} 262
  • {103} 265
  • {104} 266
  • {105} 267
  • {106} 268
  • {107} 271
  • {108} 272
  • {109} 274
  • {110} 276
  • {111} 278
  • {112} 280
  • {113} 283
  • {114} 285
  • {115} 289
  • {116} 292
  • {117} 296
  • {118} 299
  • {119} 300
  • {120} 301
  • {121} 304
  • {122} 306
  • {123} 310
  • {124} 312
  • {125} 314
  • {126} 315
  • {127} 317
  • {128} 320
  • {129} 322
  • {130} 323
  • {131} 324
  • {132} 326
  • {133} 327
  • {134} 330
  • {135} 331
  • {136} 333
  • {137} 335
  • {138} 338
  • {139} 340
  • {140} 343
  • {141} 346
  • {142} 346
  • {143} 348
  • {144} 349
  • {145} 352
  • {146} 353
  • {147} 356
  • {148} 358
  • {149} 360
  • {150} 361
  • {151} 363
  • {152} 366
  • {153} 369
  • {154} 372
  • {155} 375
  • {156} 377
  • {157} 379
  • Sources and References 383
  • Bibliography 405
  • {Index} 407
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