The Letters of Elizabeth Barrett Browning - Vol. 1

By Frederic G. Kenyon | Go to book overview

her life on the frailest of tenures, and lived in all respects the life of an invalid.


To H. S. Boyd

Monday morning, Match 27, 1838 [postmark].

My dear Friend, -- I do hope that you may not be very angry, but papa thinks -- and, indeed, I think -- that as I have already had two proof sheets and forty-eight pages, and the printers have gone on to the rest of the poem, it would not be very welcome to them if we were to ask them to retrace their steps. Besides, I would rather -- I for myself, I -- that you had the whole poem at once and clearly printed before you, to insure as many chances as possible of your liking it. I am promised to see the volume completed in three weeks from this time, so that the dreadful moment of your reading it -- I mean the 'Seraphim' part of it -- cannot be far off, and perhaps, the season being a good deal advanced even now, you might not, on consideration, wish me to retard the appearance of the book, except for some very sufficient reason. I feel very nervous about it -- far more than I did when my 'Prometheus' crept out [of] the Greek, or I myself out of the shell, in the first 'Essay on Mind.' Perhaps this is owing to Dr. Chambers's medicines, or perhaps to a consciousness that my present attempt is actually, and will be considered by others, more a trial of strength than either of my preceding ones.

Thank you for the books, and especially for the editio rarissima, which I should as soon have thought of your trusting to me as of your admitting me to stand with gloves on within a yard of Baxter. This extraordinary confidence shall not be abused.

I thank you besides for your kind inquiries about my health. Dr. Chambers did not think me worse yesterday, notwithstanding the last cold days, which have occasioned some uncomfortable sensations, and he still thinks I shall be better in the summer season. In the meantime he has

-57-

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The Letters of Elizabeth Barrett Browning - Vol. 1
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Preface v
  • Contents Of The First Volume xiii
  • Chapter I - 1806-1835 1
  • To Mrs. Boyd 7
  • To Mrs. Martin 8
  • To Mrs. Martin 16
  • To H. S. Boyd 21
  • To H. S. Boyd 23
  • To Miss Commeline 24
  • To Mrs. Martin 26
  • To H. S. Boyd 27
  • Chapter II - 1835-1841 31
  • To H. S. Boyd 37
  • To H. S. Boyd 38
  • To Mrs. Martin 41
  • To H. S. Boyd 44
  • To Mrs. Martin 45
  • To Mrs. Martin 46
  • To Miss Commeline 50
  • To H. S. Boyd 53
  • To John Kenyon2 57
  • To John Kenyon 58
  • To N. S. Boyd 60
  • To H. S. Boyd 61
  • To Miss Mitford 62
  • To H. S. Boyd 67
  • To H. S. Boyd 68
  • To H. S. Boyd 69
  • To H. S. Boyd 70
  • To H. S. Boyd 72
  • To Mrs. Martin 73
  • To H S. Boyd 75
  • To H. S. Boyd 77
  • To H. S. Boyd 79
  • To Mrs. Martin 81
  • To Mrs. Martin 85
  • To H. S. Boyd 86
  • To H. S. Boyd 88
  • Chapter III - 1841-1843 91
  • To Mr. Westwood1 93
  • To H. S. Boyd 94
  • To H. S. Boyd 95
  • To H. S. Boyd 96
  • To H. S. Boyd 98
  • To H. S. Boyd 101
  • To H. S. Boyd 101
  • To H. S. Boyd 102
  • To H. S. Boyd 103
  • To H. S. Boyd 104
  • To H. S. Boyd 105
  • To John Kenyon 108
  • To Mrs. Martin 109
  • To H. S. Boyd 110
  • To H. S. Boyd 113
  • To H. S. Boyd 115
  • To H. S. Boyd 117
  • To H. S. Boyd 118
  • To Mrs. Martin 119
  • To James Martin 121
  • To H. S. Boyd 122
  • To H. S. Boyd 124
  • To John Kenyon 125
  • To John Kenyon 127
  • To Cornelius Mathews 129
  • To John Kenyon 136
  • To H. S. Boyd 137
  • To H. S. Boyd 138
  • To H. S. Boyd 139
  • To John Kenyon 143
  • To John Kenyon 145
  • To Mrs. Martin 147
  • To Mr. Westwood 149
  • To Mrs. Martin 150
  • To Mr. Westwood 154
  • To Mr. Westwood 159
  • To Mr. Westwood 160
  • Chapter IV - 1844-1846 164
  • To H. S. Boyd 173
  • To H S. Boyd 175
  • To H. S. Boyd 175
  • To H. S. Boyd 179
  • To H. S. Boyd 183
  • To Mr. Westwood 184
  • To John Kenyon 185
  • To Mrs. Martin 189
  • To Mr. Chorley 190
  • To H. S. Boyd 191
  • To Mrs. Martin 192
  • To Mrs. Martin 193
  • To Cornelius Mathews 196
  • To H. S. Boyd 198
  • To John Kenyon 202
  • To Mrs. Martin 203
  • To John Kenyon 205
  • To John Kenyon 209
  • To Cornelius Mathews 213
  • To Mrs. Martin 215
  • To James Martin 216
  • To Mrs. Martin 219
  • To John Kenyon 221
  • To Mr. Westwood 223
  • To H. S. Boyd 224
  • To Mr. Chorley 229
  • To Mr. Chorley 234
  • To Mrs. Martin 236
  • To Mrs. Martin 237
  • To Miss Commeline 239
  • To H. S. Boyd 240
  • To Mr. Westwood 242
  • To John Kenyon 244
  • To H. S. Boyd 245
  • To John Kenyon 246
  • To John Kenyon 248
  • To H. S. Boyd 249
  • To Mrs. Martin 250
  • To Mr. Westwood 251
  • To Mr. Westwood 253
  • To Mr. Chorley 254
  • To Mr. Chorley 255
  • To Miss Thomson1 257
  • To Miss Thomson 260
  • To Mrs Jameson 271
  • To Mrs. Martin 273
  • To Mrs. Martin 276
  • To H. S. Boyd 277
  • Chapter V - 1846-1849 280
  • To Mrs. Martin 297
  • To Miss Mitford 299
  • To Mrs. Jameson 304
  • To Miss Mitford 308
  • To H. S. Boyd 310
  • To Miss Mitford 314
  • To Miss Browning 317
  • To Mr. Westwood 323
  • To Mrs. Jameson 325
  • To H. S. Boyd 328
  • To Mrs. Martin 335
  • To Mr. Westwood 339
  • To Miss Mitford 345
  • To Mrs. Jameson 354
  • To Miss Mitford 356
  • To John Kenyon 358
  • To Miss Browning 369
  • To Miss Mitford 371
  • To Mrs. Jameson 373
  • To Miss Mitford 376
  • To Miss Mitford 379
  • To Mrs. Martin 384
  • To Miss Mitford 387
  • Chapter VI - 1849-1851 395
  • To Miss Mitford 399
  • To Mrs. Martin 404
  • To Mrs. Jameson 410
  • To Miss Mitford 414
  • To Mrs. Jameson 417
  • To Miss Mitford 421
  • To Miss Mitford 423
  • To Miss Mitford 427
  • To Miss Browning 430
  • To Miss Mitford 432
  • To Mrs. Jameson 437
  • To Miss I. Blagden 453
  • To Miss Mitford 456
  • To Miss Mitford 458
  • To Miss I. Blagden 467
  • To Miss Mitford 468
  • To Mrs. Martin 470
  • To Miss Browning 475
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