Documents Illustrative of the Formation of the Union of the American States

By Charles C. Tansill; Library of Congress Legislative Reference Service | Go to book overview

CONTENTS
Page
Declaration and resolves of the First Continental Congress, October 14, 17741-5
Resolves adopted in Charlotte Town, Mecklenburg County, N. C., May 31, 17756-9
Declaration of the causes and necessity of taking up arms, July 6, 177510-17
Resolution of secrecy adopted by the Continental Congress, November 9, 177518
Preamble and resolution of the Virginia Convention, May 15, 1776, instructing the Virginia Delegates in the Continental Congress to "propose to that respectable body to declare the United Colonies free and independent States19-20
Resolution introduced in the Continental Congress by Richard Henry Lee (Virginia) proposing a Declaration of Independence, June 7, 177621
Declaration of Independence, July 4, 177622-26
Articles of Confederation, March 1, 178127-37
Resolution of the General Assembly of Virginia, January 21, 1786, proposing a joint meeting of commissioners from the States to consider and recommend a Federal plan for regulating commerce38
Proceedings of commissioners to remedy defects of the Federal Government, Annapolis, Md., 178639-43
Report of proceedings in Congress, Wednesday, February 21, 178744-46
Ordinance of 1787, July 13, 178747-54
Credentials of the members of the Federal Convention55-84
List of delegates appointed by the States represented in the Federal Convention.85-86
Notes of Major William Pierce (Georgia) in the Federal Convention of 1787: a. Loose sketches and notes taken in the convention, May, 178787-95
b. Characters in the convention of the States held at Philadelphia, May, 178796-108
Debates in the Federal Convention of 1787 as reported by James Madison109-745
Secret proceedings and debates of the convention assembled at Philadelphia, in the year 1797, for the purpose of forming the Constitution of the United States of America. (From the notes taken by the late Robert Yates, Esq., Chief Justice of New York (Albany, 1821))746-843
Notes of Rufus King in the Federal Convention of 1787844-878
Notes of William Paterson in the Federal Convention of 1787879-912
Notes of Alexander Hamilton in the Federal Convention of 1787913-922
Papers of Dr. James McHenry on the Federal Convention of 1787923-952
Variant texts of the Virginia plan presented by Edmund Randolph to the Federal Convention, May 29, 1787:
Text A953-956
Text B957-959
Text C960-963
The plan of Charles Pinckney (South Carolina), presented to the Federal Convention, May 29, 1787964-966

-IX-

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