Wilson and the Peacemakers: Combining Woodrow Wilson and the Lost Peace and Woodrow Wilson and the Great Betrayal

By Thomas A. Bailey | Go to book overview

BIBLIOGRAPHICAL NOTES

INTRODUCTION

THIS BOOK is primarily a synthesis, not a research project on a monographic scale. It is largely, though by no means solely, a reinterpretation of facts that have for some little while been generally available, and for this reason, among others, it has not seemed desirable to present elaborate footnote documentation. Bibliographical comments are confined to moot questions, or to problems which need further amplification.

The bibliographies here listed are not exhaustive, but in a general way they indicate the most important sources of information, as well as the materials from which the basic facts have been drawn. This is primarily a study of the peace from the American point of view, and more particularly from that of Wilson, and consequently no effort has been made to present extensive references bearing upon purely European problems, though there exists a vast body of literature on this phase of the subject. Where translations exist, the English version is cited. Interest in the Treaty of Versailles has been so great that fortunately for the general reader most of the important French and German secondary accounts have been translated.

This study is particularly concerned with the reactions of American public opinion, and extensive use has been made of the newspaper press, notably the New York Times, and of the periodical press, notably the Literary Digest. Use has also been made of the important documentary collections in print, as well as other published materials, official or otherwise. It has been necessary to borrow heavily from the researches of others, and it can only be hoped that they have been given adequate recognition. In most cases it would have been a profitless expenditure of time to go behind their findings.

The archives of the Department of State are not currently available to investigators, though the publication by the Department

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