CONTENTS
CHAPTER I
PAGE
INTRODUCTORY: GENERAL CHARACTER OF GREEK ART
1

Meaning of the term "a grammar." Art like literature has a language which may be set forth, 1. The study of development contrasted with the search for origins, 3. Mistakes sometimes made, 6. Simplicity and intellectual character of Greek art, 7. Ideality of Greek art , 9. Idealism and naturalism , 11. Greek art generically ideal , 15.

CHAPTER II
ANCIENT CRITICS ON ART
17

Views of Socrates on art , 17. Views of Plato, 18. The Poetics of Aristotle, 19. Symmetry and rhythm, 22. Ethos and pathos, 24. Later critics , 27.

CHAPTER III
ARCHITECTURE
28

Influence of country and race , 28; of religion , 29. Plan of the temple, 31. Simplicity , 33; careful proportions , 33. Decoration confined to useless parts, 34.Doric and Ionic styles , 36. Colouring , 37. Rational character , 38. Adaptation to perspective, 39.

CHAPTER IV
DRESS AND DRAPERY
41

Sculptural dress not precisely that worn , 41. Ionian dress , 42. Dorian dress , 45. The overdress , 48. Mixture of dress in later art, 50. Dress passing into drapery , 52.

-ix-

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