Mystical Elements in Mohammed

By John Clark Archer | Go to book overview

III
MOHAMMED'S IDEA OF GOD

Let us turn our attention now to the facts themselves which lend color and support to our assertion regarding the presence and practice of the mystical in the career of the Arabian prophet.

We shall consider first of all Mohammed's idea of God, and especially his idea of the relation of God to the world, including himself. This is essential background for our theme. God is the great fact in Mohammed's experience. There is no God but Allah, "The King, the Holy, the Peaceful, the Faithful, the Guardian, the Mighty, the Strong, the Most High, the Producer, the Maker, the Fashioner, the Wise" (59:23-24). There is for the Prophet no sin to compare with belief in associates of Allah, or in other gods (4:51). Add to the fact of God the fact of Mohammed's apostleship and you then have the brief and simple dogma upon which hangs all the fabric of Islam (2:158; 3:1, etc).70

There is, as we have already noted, no explicit speculation on Mohammed's part with respect to God. His own description (in the narrow sense) of God is the 112th sura of the Koran,

"Say: He is God alone: God the eternal! He begetteth
not, and He is not begotten; and there is none like unto Him,"

which was revealed, say Zamakhsharī and Baiḍāwī,71 to meet a specific request for a description of God. Aside from that, one is confined virtually to the excellent titles"

cf. 59:24, 7:179, 17:110) as indicative of God's attributes, and therefore of his nature.72 It is not, however, altogether impos-

____________________
70
Cf. Margoliouth, 81.
71
Commentaries, in loco.
72
It never occurred to Mohammed that attributes, as later thought of, might impair in any way the divine unity. There are in all the Koran ninety-nine of these "excellent names," or attributes of God.

-28-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Mystical Elements in Mohammed
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page 3
  • Preface 5
  • Contents 7
  • Introduction 9
  • I - The Case for Pathology 14
  • II - The Mystical Element 24
  • III - Mohammed's Idea of God 28
  • IV - Record of the Mystical 41
  • V - Mohammed's View of the World 52
  • VI - The Objective Origin of the Mystical 56
  • VII - The Christian Monk 61
  • Viii Mohammed's Practice of the Mystical 71
  • IX - The Angel Gabriel 79
  • X - "The Inspired Man" 85
  • Summary 87
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 87

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.