Studies in English Commerce and Exploration in the Reign of Elizabeth

By Albert Lindsay Rowland; George Born Manhart | Go to book overview

CHAPTER VIII
DIFFICULT DIPLOMACY

Another matter which the English agent inherited from his predecessor was the hostility of the French Ambassador, which was to become an increasingly serious problem, not only for Barton but for his successor. As we have already seen, deLancosme arrived at the Porte as Germigny's successor in March of 1586 and, although he did all that he could to displace Harborne, the latter had succeeded so well in establishing himself during the year and a half in which Henry declined to send an Ambassador to Turkey, that the Frenchman's efforts only made him disliked both by the Turkish officials and his colleagues and paved the way for his dismissal. It is difficult to see, however, how any amount of tact could have availed at this time to save the French Ambassador from defeat, as the situation in his native country was too kaleidoscopic for the wisest diplomatist to act with any certainty that he would be approved. After wobbling in his usual fashion between the three parties that struggled for the mastery of his distracted country, Henry, the last of the Valois, fled from the vengeance of the Guise into the camp of his cousin the King of Navarre, only to be murdered by a religious fanatic and leave his legitimate successor a Protestant. This was in July, 1589, but many long years of struggle were in store for the new King ere he could be crowned as the recognized sovereign of the nation. Meanwhile, other claimants to the throne arose and, with more or less success,

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