Studies in English Commerce and Exploration in the Reign of Elizabeth

By Albert Lindsay Rowland; George Born Manhart | Go to book overview

CHAPTER IX
WAR WITH THE EMPEROR

A casus belli between the German Emperor and the Porte lay always ready in those border states of the Empire for which tribute must be paid to the Sultan. War in Hungary had caused the Emperor to postpone the payment in the case of Bosnia and the Grand Visir was expecting it in full in the spring of 1593. The Imperial Ambassador, however, presented further excuses, which particularly enraged the Turkish Minister, as he had already informed the Sultan that the tribute would be paid that year. He accordingly sequestered the Ambassador's house, arrested his Dragoman on a charge of treachery and of having made false translations of various documents, and seized all the Embassy papers. Following this war was declared against the Emperor in a public divan and the Spahis, under the Beglierbey of Greece, were ordered to the front.1 The Ambassador in a panic offered six thousand thalers to the Grand Vizir which he later raised to eighteen thousand, for the release of his Dragoman and promised the tribute by July, but the Vizir declined to act and the Ambassador remained a prisoner in his house while his Dragoman was confined in the common jail.

Barton had, of course, communicated the trend of events to his government and the Queen, alarmed by the constant complaints that England was responsible for the impending Turkish aggression, wrote to her Ambas-

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1
Cal. State Papers, Venetian, vol, 9, no. 159.

-123-

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