Studies in English Commerce and Exploration in the Reign of Elizabeth

By Albert Lindsay Rowland; George Born Manhart | Go to book overview

CHAPTER X
A WORTHY REPRESENTATIVE

It would perhaps be well at this time to turn to a consideration of the English shipping to Turkey during the years of Barton's incumbency. Unfortunately, the records for such an account are extremely meagre and only in isolated documents is there any light thrown upon this matter. In 1592 we find a petition of Thomas Cordell, William Garway, Edward Holmeden, Paul Banynge1 and other members of the company of merchants trading to the Levant, stating that three ships carrying thirty eight, twenty eight and twenty five men respectively and being of a burden of two hundred, one hundred forty and one hundred twenty tons; loaded with lead, tin, kerseys, and wool, bound for Zante and Venice, were ready to sail and that return cargoes of currants and oil were lying waiting for them at Venice and Zante. The ships had sailed as far as Gravesend when they were all stayed by an order of the Privy Council. Since then, for a period of three months, the merchants had been at great charges for wages, victuals, etc. They, therefore, begged their lordships to discharge the ships and let them go on their voyage especially as seven sail of ships had come to England from Venice, Zante and Candia and four more were looked for daily, in addition to several that were also expected from Leghorn, Marseilles and Naples.2

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1
It is interesting to note that these names are seldom spelled twice in the same way.
2
State Papers, Dom., Elizabeth, vol. 246, fol. 57.

-137-

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