The Yemassee

By William Gilmore Simms; Alexander Cowie | Go to book overview

CHAPTER XI

"A vengeance for the traitors; vengeance deep
As is their treason — curses loud and long,
Surpassing their own infamy and guilt."

SANUTEE, the " Well Beloved," was not disposed to yield up the territory of his forefathers without further struggle. The Yemassees were something of a republic, and the appeal of the old patriot now lay with the people. He was much better acquainted with the popular feeling than those who had so far sacrificed it; and, though maddened with indignation, he was yet sufficiently cool to determine the most effectual course for the attainment of his object. Not suspecting his design, the remaining chiefs continued in council, in deliberations of one sort or another; probably in adjusting the mode of distributing their spoils; while the English commissioners, having succeeded in their object, retired for the night to the dwelling of Granger, the Indian trader — a Scotch adventurer, who had been permitted to take up his abode in the village, and from his quiet, unobtrusive, and conciliatory habits, had contrived to secure much of the respect and good will of the Yemassees. Sanute[e], meanwhile, discussed his proposed undertaking with his three companions, Enoree-Mattee, the prophet, Ishiagaska, and Choluculla, all of whom were privy to the meditated insurrection. He next sought out all the most influential and fearless of the Yemassees. Nor did he confine himself to these. The rash, the thoughtless, the ignorant — all were aroused by his eloquence. To each of these he detailed the recent proceedings of council, and, in his own vehement manner, explained the evil consequences to the people of such a treaty; taking care to shape his information to the mind or mood of each individual to whom he spoke. To one he painted the growing insolence of the whites, increasing with their increasing strength, almost too great, already, for any control or management. To another, he described the ancient glories of his nation, rapidly departing in the subservience with which their chiefs acknowledged the influence, and truckled to the desires of the English. To a third, he deplored the loss of the noble forests of his forefathers, hewn down by the axe, to make

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The Yemassee
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • American Fiction Series *
  • The Yemassee *
  • Preface v
  • Contents vii
  • Illustrations vii
  • Introduction ix
  • A Simms Chronology xxxvi
  • Selected Bibliography xxxvii
  • The Yemassee Uprising xlii
  • Note on the Text *
  • To Professor Samuel Henry Dickson, M.D., of South Carolina 3
  • Chapter I 9
  • Chapter II 15
  • Chapter III 21
  • Chapter IV 28
  • Chapter V 34
  • Chapter VI 43
  • Chapter VII 51
  • Chapter VIII 65
  • Chapter IX 74
  • Chapter X 81
  • Chapter XI 91
  • Chapter XII 98
  • Chapter XIII 105
  • Chapter XIV 113
  • Chapter XV 118
  • Chapter XVI 123
  • Chapter XVII 133
  • Chapter XVIII 139
  • Chapter XIX 146
  • Chapter XX 151
  • Chapter XXI 159
  • Chapter XXII 165
  • Chapter XXIII 173
  • Chapter XXIV 182
  • Chapter XXV 188
  • Chapter XXVI 201
  • Chapter XXVII 210
  • Chapter XXVIII 215
  • Chapter XXIX 222
  • Chapter XXX 229
  • Chapter XXXI 235
  • Chapter XXXII 243
  • Chapter XXXIII 249
  • Chapter XXXIV 255
  • Chapter XXXV 265
  • Chapter XXXVI 271
  • Chapter XXXVII 276
  • Chapter XXXVIII 283
  • Chapter Xxxix 295
  • Chapter XL 300
  • Chapter XLI 307
  • Chapter XLII 314
  • Chapter XLIII 322
  • Chapter XLIV 329
  • Chapter XLV 336
  • Chapter XLVI 345
  • Chapter XLVII 355
  • Chapter XLVIII 363
  • Chapter Xlix 375
  • Chapter L 382
  • Chapter LI 389
  • Chapter LII 396
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