Poetic Drama: An Anthology of Plays in Verse from the Ancient Greek to the Modern American

By Alfred Kreymborg | Go to book overview

In our fair selves the treasure recognize,
Which in the world he long had sought in vain!

Leon. To your light raillery I must submit:
So light its touch it passeth harmless by.
I honor all men after their desert,
And am in truth toward Tasso only just.
His eye scarce lingers on this earthly scene:
To nature's harmony his car is tuned.
What history offers, and what life presents,
His bosom promptly and with joy receives:
The widely scattered is by him combined,
And his quick feeling animates the dead.
Oft he ennobles what we count for naught:
What others treasure is by him despised.
Thus moving in his own enchanted sphere,
The wondrous man doth still allure us on
To wander with him and partake his joy:
Though seeming to approach us, he remains
Remote as ever; and perchance his eye,
Resting on us, sees spirits in our place.

Prin. Thou hast with taste and truth portrayed the
bard,
Who hovers in the shadowy realm of dreams.
And yet reality, it seems to me,
Hath also power to lure him and enchain.
In the sweet sonnets, scattered here and there,
With which we sometimes find our trees adorned,
Creating like the golden fruit of old
A new Hesperia, perceivest thou not
The gentle tokens of a genuine love?

Leon. In these fair leaves I also take delight.
With all his rich diversity of thought
He glorifies one form in all his strains.
Now he exalts her to the starry heavens
In radiant glory, and before that form
Bows down, like angels in the realms above.
Then, stealing after her through silent fields,
He garlands in his wreath each beauteous flower;
And, should the form he worships disappear,
Hallows the path her gentle foot hath trod.
Thus like the nightingale, concealed in shade,
From his love-laden breast he fills the air
And neighboring thickets with melodious plaints:
His blissful sadness and his tuneful grief
Charm every ear, enrapture every heart--

Prin. And Leonora is the favored name
Selected for the object of his strains.

Leon. Thy name it is, my princess, as 'tis mine.
It would displease me were it otherwise.
Now I rejoice that under this disguise
He can conceal his sentiment for thee,
And am no less contented with the thought
That this sweet name should also picture me.
Here is no question of an ardent love,
Seeking possession, and with jealous care
Screening its object from another's gaze.
While he enraptured contemplates thy worth,
He in my lighter nature may rejoice.
He loves not us,--forgive me what I say,--
His loved ideal from the spheres he brings,
And doth invest it with the name we bear:
His feeling we participate; we seem
To love the man, yet only love in him
The highest object that can claim our love.

Prin. In this deep science thou art deeply versed,
My Leonora; and thy words in truth
Play on my ear, yet scarcely reach my soul.

Leon. Thou Plato's pupil I and not comprehend
What a mere novice dares to prattle to thee?
It must be, then, that I have widely erred;
Yet well I know I do not wholly err.
For love doth in this graceful school appear
No longer as the spoilt and wayward child:
He is the youth whom Psyche hath espoused,
Who sits in council with the assembled gods.
He hath relinquished passion's fickle sway:
He clings no longer with delusion sweet
To outward form and beauty, to atone
For brief excitement by disgust and hate.

Prin. Here comes my brother! let us not betray
Whithcr our converse hath conducted us;
Else we shall have his raillery to bear,
As in our dress he found a theme for jest.


SCENE II

(Princess, Leonora, Alphonso.)

Alph. Tasso I seek, whom nowhere I can find;
And even here, with you, I meet him not.
Can you inform me where he hides himself?

Ptin. I have scarce seen him for the last two days.

Alph. 'Tis his habitual failing that he seeks
Seclusion rather than society.
I can forgive him when the motley crowd
Thus studiously he shuns, and loves to hold
Free converse with himself in solitude;
Yet can I not approve that he should thus
Also the circle of his friends avoid.

Leon. If I mistake not, thou wilt soon, O prince!
Convert this censure into joyful praise.
To-day I saw him from afar: he held

-527-

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Poetic Drama: An Anthology of Plays in Verse from the Ancient Greek to the Modern American
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Acknowledgments vi
  • Contents vii
  • Lines Before the Curtain 1
  • Introduction the Story of Poetic Drama 3
  • Preface to Agamemnon 45
  • Preface 45
  • Preface to Oedipus Coloneus 68
  • Preface 68
  • Oedipus Coloneus 70
  • Preface to Ion 94
  • Preface 94
  • Ion 96
  • Preface to the Acharnians 122
  • Preface 122
  • Preface to Oriental Plays 146
  • Preface 146
  • The Chalk Circle 148
  • Act I 150
  • Act I 158
  • Act I 164
  • Act IV 168
  • Nakamitsu (manju) 174
  • Preface to Medieval Plays 178
  • The Mystery of Adam 180
  • Abraham, Melchisedec, and Isaac 194
  • The Second Shepherds' Play 199
  • The Second Shepherds' Play 208
  • The Second Shepherds' Play 218
  • Preface to Tamburlaine the Great 223
  • Preface 223
  • The First Part of Tamburlaine the Great 225
  • Act I 225
  • Act I 225
  • Act I 227
  • Act I 230
  • Act I 230
  • Act I 231
  • Act I 232
  • Act I 232
  • Act I 233
  • Act I 234
  • Act I 235
  • Act III 236
  • Scene II 236
  • Scene II 238
  • Scene II 241
  • Scene II 241
  • Scene II 242
  • Scene III 243
  • Scene III 244
  • Scene III 245
  • Scene III 245
  • Preface to Measure for Measure 252
  • Preface 252
  • Measure for Measure 254
  • Scene IV 258
  • Scene IV 259
  • Scene IV 259
  • Scene II 263
  • Scene III 265
  • Scene III 266
  • Scene III 268
  • Scene III 268
  • Scene III 271
  • Scene III 274
  • Scene III 274
  • Scene III 275
  • Scene III 278
  • Scene III 280
  • Scene III 281
  • Scene III 281
  • Scene III 281
  • Scene III 281
  • Preface to Volpone 289
  • Preface 289
  • Volpone or the Fox 291
  • Act I 292
  • Act I 292
  • Act I 301
  • Act I 301
  • Act I 306
  • Scene III 307
  • Act III 309
  • Act III 309
  • Act III 310
  • Act III 313
  • Act III 313
  • Scene V 314
  • Scene VI 314
  • Scene VI 318
  • Scene VI 318
  • Scene VI 322
  • Scene VI 327
  • Scene VI 327
  • Scene VI 331
  • Scene III 333
  • Scene IV 333
  • Scene IV 334
  • Scene IV 335
  • Scene IV 336
  • Scene IV 336
  • Preface to a New Way to Pay Old Debts 340
  • Preface 340
  • A New Way to Pay Old Debts 341
  • Act I 341
  • Act II 346
  • Act II 348
  • Act II 348
  • Act II 350
  • Act II 353
  • Act III 355
  • Scene II 356
  • Scene II 361
  • Scene II 362
  • Scene II 362
  • Scene II 365
  • Scene II 367
  • Scene II 369
  • Scene II 369
  • Scene II 375
  • Preface to the White Devil 376
  • Preface 376
  • The White Devil; Or, Vittoria Corombona 378
  • Scene II 379
  • Scene II 384
  • Scene II 384
  • Scene II 388
  • Scene II 389
  • Scene II 390
  • Act III 392
  • Scene II 398
  • Scene II 400
  • Scene II 400
  • Scene II 403
  • Act V 406
  • Scene II 409
  • Scene II 410
  • Scene V 417
  • Scene VI 417
  • Preface to the Sheep Well 422
  • Preface 422
  • The Sheep Well 424
  • Act II 432
  • Preface to Cinna 449
  • Preface 449
  • Cinna or the Mercy of Augustus 451
  • Scene II 452
  • Scene II 453
  • Scene II 454
  • Scene II 455
  • Scene II 455
  • Scene II 458
  • Act III 459
  • Scene II 460
  • Scene III 460
  • Scene III 461
  • Scene V 463
  • Act IV 463
  • Scene II 463
  • Scene II 463
  • Scene II 464
  • Scene II 465
  • Scene II 466
  • Scene II 466
  • Scene II 466
  • Scene II 468
  • Scene III 469
  • Preface to Athaliah 471
  • Preface 471
  • Athaliah a Tragedy Founded Upon Holy Scripture 473
  • Scene II 475
  • Scene II 476
  • Scene II 476
  • Scene II 477
  • Scene II 477
  • Scene II 477
  • Scene II 478
  • Scene II 478
  • Scene II 478
  • Scene II 480
  • Scene II 480
  • Scene II 482
  • Scene II 482
  • Scene II 483
  • Scene II 483
  • Scene II 484
  • Scene III 484
  • Scene III 485
  • Scene III 485
  • Scene III 486
  • Scene III 486
  • Scene VIII 488
  • Act IV 488
  • Act IV 488
  • Act IV 489
  • Act IV 489
  • Act IV 490
  • Act IV 491
  • Act IV 491
  • Act IV 492
  • Act IV 492
  • Scene II 493
  • Scene III 494
  • Scene IV 494
  • Scene V 494
  • Scene V 495
  • Scene VII 496
  • Scene VIII 496
  • Preface to the Misanthrope 497
  • Preface 497
  • The Misanthrope 499
  • Scene II 502
  • Scene II 504
  • Scene II 505
  • Scene II 505
  • Scene II 506
  • Scene II 506
  • Scene II 506
  • Scene II 506
  • Scene VI 509
  • Scene VII 509
  • Act III 509
  • Act III 509
  • Act III 510
  • Act III 510
  • Act III 511
  • Act III 511
  • Act III 512
  • Act IV 514
  • Scene II 515
  • Scene III 515
  • Scene III 517
  • Scene III 518
  • Scene III 518
  • Scene III 519
  • Scene III 520
  • Scene III 520
  • Scene III 521
  • Scene III 521
  • Scene VII 522
  • Scene VIII 522
  • Preface to Torquato Tasso 523
  • Preface 523
  • Torquato Tasso a Drama in Five Acts 525
  • Scene II 527
  • Scene II 529
  • Scene II 531
  • Scene II 533
  • Scene II 533
  • Scene II 537
  • Scene III 537
  • Scene V 542
  • Act III 542
  • Scene II 542
  • Scene II 542
  • Scene II 545
  • Scene II 545
  • Scene II 548
  • Scene II 548
  • Scene II 548
  • Scene II 548
  • Scene II 551
  • Act V 555
  • Scene II 556
  • Scene II 557
  • Scene IV 558
  • Scene V 559
  • Preface to the Death of Wallenstein 562
  • Preface 562
  • The Death of Wallenstein 564
  • Scene II 565
  • Scene III 565
  • Scene III 566
  • Scene III 567
  • Scene III 570
  • Scene III 570
  • Scene III 573
  • Scene III 573
  • Scene III 574
  • Scene III 576
  • Scene IV 577
  • Scene V 577
  • Scene V 578
  • Scene VII 581
  • Act III 582
  • Scene II 582
  • Scene II 582
  • Scene II 583
  • Scene II 584
  • Scene II 586
  • Scene VI 587
  • Scene VII 587
  • Scene VII 588
  • Scene VII 588
  • Scene XI 590
  • Scene XII 590
  • Scene XIII 590
  • Scene XIII 591
  • Scene XIII 591
  • Scene XIII 593
  • Scene XIII 593
  • Scene XIII 594
  • Scene XIX 596
  • Scene XX 596
  • Scene XX 597
  • Scene XX 598
  • Scene XX 598
  • Scene XX 599
  • Scene XX 599
  • Scene XX 599
  • Scene XX 601
  • Scene XX 602
  • Scene XX 602
  • Scene XX 602
  • Scene VII 605
  • Scene IX 606
  • Scene IX 607
  • Scene IX 608
  • Scene IX 609
  • Scene IX 609
  • Scene IX 610
  • Scene IX 610
  • Scene IX 610
  • Scene IX 610
  • Scene IX 613
  • Scene IX 615
  • Scene IX 616
  • Scene IX 617
  • Scene IX 618
  • Scene IX 618
  • Scene IX 618
  • Scene IX 619
  • Scene IX 619
  • Scene IX 620
  • Preface to the ] 621
  • Preface 621
  • E Cenci 622
  • Act I 622
  • Scene III 625
  • Act II 627
  • Act II 627
  • Act II 629
  • Act III 631
  • Scene II 635
  • Scene II 636
  • Scene II 636
  • Scene II 638
  • Scene II 639
  • Scene II 640
  • Act V 643
  • Scene II 644
  • Scene II 646
  • Scene II 648
  • Preface to the White Saviour 650
  • Preface 650
  • The White Saviour a Dramatic Fantasy 651
  • Second Scene 653
  • Second Scene 657
  • Second Scene 662
  • Second Scene 665
  • Sixth Scene 671
  • Seventh Scene 676
  • Seventh Scene 683
  • Seventh Scene 689
  • Seventh Scene 693
  • Seventh Scene 698
  • Preface to the Last Night of Don Juan 702
  • Preface 702
  • The Last Night of Don Juan 703
  • Preface to the King's Threshold 726
  • Preface 726
  • Preface to Gruach 740
  • Preface 740
  • Gruach by Gordon Bottomley 741
  • Preface to the Dog Beneath the Skin 757
  • Preface 757
  • Act I 760
  • Scene II 765
  • Scene II 767
  • Scene II 768
  • Scene II 771
  • Scene II 773
  • Scene II 778
  • Scene III 781
  • Act III 788
  • Scene II 789
  • Scene III 793
  • Scene IV 793
  • Scene V 799
  • Epilogue 804
  • Preface to the Death of Eve 806
  • Preface 806
  • Preface to Aria Da Capo 818
  • Preface 818
  • Preface to Hole in the Wall 826
  • Preface 826
  • Preface to the Fall of the City 832
  • Preface 832
  • Preface to Shenandoah 842
  • Preface 842
  • Supplementary Lists and Reading 853
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