VI.
THE VERDICT OF HISTORY

... This proposal to pack the Supreme Court is without precedence in American jurisprudence and ... we must go back for a corresponding scheme to the infamous processes of the British Star Chamber.

— Senator Carter Glass

THE United States has reached a point in its evolution where the judgment of history is certain to be invoked in the decision of major political issues. Our traditions are not ancient. Yet we are celebrating this year the one hundred and fiftieth anniversary of the Constitution. During the last century and a half some effective precedents have been established, and the idea of continuity for our political institutions has taken firm root.

In view of this growing consciousness of our past, any statesman must expect a drastic proposal or a revolutionary method to be measured against the national experience. Before taking a step off the beaten path people wish to know whether it has been done before, and, if so, with what results. President Roosevelt was fully cognizant of that attitude when he asked Congress for the privilege of remaking the Supreme Court. That is why he prefaced his message with a recital of the various

-54-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Supreme Court Crisis
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • About the Editor *
  • The Supreme Court Crisis *
  • Foreword v
  • Contents *
  • I. the President's Dilemma 1
  • Ii. a Case Built on Sand 1o
  • Iii. Mr. Justice Roosevelt 22
  • Iv. the Balance Wheel of Democracy 29
  • V. is the Hughes Court Packed? 4o
  • Vi. the Verdict of History 54
  • Vii. the Real Mandate from the People 63
  • Viii. More Honored in the Breach 75
  • Ix. What is the Crisis? 81
  • X. the Constitutional Way 88
  • Xi. Conclusions 102
  • Bibliography 1o7
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 102

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.