The Beginnings of Quakerism

By William C. Braithwaite | Go to book overview

CHAPTER IX
FURTHER WORK IN THE SOUTH (1655)

We endeavour to give people no cause for stumbling in anything, lest the work we are doing should fill into discredit. On the contrary, as God's servers, we seek their full approval--by unwearied endurance, by afflictions, by distress, by helplessness; by floggings, by imprisonments; by facing riots, by toil, by sleepless watching, by hunger and thirst; by purity of life, by knowledge, by patience, by kindness, by the Holy Spirit, by sincere love; by the proclamation of the truth, by the power of God; by the weapons of righteousness, wielded in both hands; through honour and ignominy, through calumny and praise. We are looked upon as imposters, and yet are true men; as obscure persons, and yet are well known; as on the point of death, and yet, strange to tell, we live; as under God's discipline, and yet we are not deprived of life; as sad, but we are always joyful; as poor, but we bestow wealth on many I as having nothing, and yet we securely possess all things ( 2 Corinthians vi. 3-10).--From Dr. WEYMOUTH'S The New Testament in Modern Speech

Fox had spent the later months of this memorable year, 1654, in Yorkshire and neighbouring counties, confirming the Churches. From Thomas Stacey's at Cinderhill Green, about August,1 he issued a letter of counsel and cheer to the Quaker Publishers of Truth. Early in January 1655 he arranged a meeting at Swannington in Leicestershire, which was attended, amongst others, by Aldam and Farnsworth, Camm probably and Audland and Capt. Pyott from Bristol, and Burrough and Howgill who were passing north from London.2 This "concourse of two

____________________
1
Dewsbury, who was not released from York till 24th July, seems to have been with Fox at this time. See letter to Margt. Fell, Swarthm. Colln. iv. 144. The letter of counsel is in Journ. i. 190, and the Camb. Journ. i. 142 says it was issued from Cinderhill Green. According to Norman Penney, Camb. Journ. i. 423, the place is now called Handsworth Grange.
2
See Journ. i. 199. For Camm's name, see Geo. Taylor to Margt. Fell, Swarthm. Colln. i. 210.

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