I. THE STRUCTURE OF THE UN

EDITOR'S INTRODUCTION

The purpose of this section is to give the reader a brief review of the structure and organization of the UN. The material in this part does not give a full picture of these subjects: any attempt at completeness would require at least half of this volume. There are now many easily available publications which examine this topic. The reader may look back at a previous book in this series: The UN Today, edited by William W. Wade. In addition several volumes giving information of this type are listed in the bibliography: notably Everyman's United Nations.

Perhaps equally important in determining the amount of space allocated to this subject is the fact that the formal organization charts and lists of organizations fail to convey the reality of the work of the UN. The UN is only partly a formal organization; it is also a place where informal contacts between delegates of different countries can take place: and it is these which often allow the transfer of ideas and knowledge and the limitation of conflict in a way which would not be possible in any other context. Indeed, it has been argued that delegates to the UN almost inevitably become one of the major educative forces for their own departments of state as they report what world opinion will, and will not, permit.

The first piece in this section, by Alexander Uhl, reports the atmosphere in which the UN was created immediately after World War II; the second describes the formal goals of the organization. The third discusses the evolution in the role of the Secretary General. The fourth and fifth selections set out, briefly, the structure of the organization at headquarters and the roles and functions of the specialized agencies. The final selection discusses the way in which United States policy for the UN is formulated.


A NEW START

When the United Nations was established in San Francisco in 1945, there was a great wave of hope among millions of Amer-

____________________
1

From The US and the UN: Partners for Peace, pamphlet by Alexander Uhl, writer on UN affairs. Public Affairs Institute. 312 Pennsylvania Ave. Washington 3, D.C. '62. p 7-10. Reprinted by permission.

-7-

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The Un and Its Future
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page 1
  • Preface 3
  • Contents 5
  • I. the Structure of the Un 7
  • Ii. World Politics and the Un 38
  • Iii. Economics and the Un 97
  • Iv. the Future of the Un 136
  • Bibliography 182
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