The Ever-Present Origin

By Jean Gebser; Noel Barstad et al. | Go to book overview
the realization of timelessness,
the realization of temporicity,
the realization of the concept of time,
the realization of time-freedom (the achronon),
the disruption of the merely systematic,
the incursion of dynamics,
the recognition of energy,
the mastery of movement,
the fourth dimension,
the supersession of patriarchy,
the renunciation of dominance and power,
the acquisition of intensity,
clarity (instead of mere wakefulness),
and the transformation of the creative inceptual basis.

These key terms presuppose the overcoming, or at least an attempt at overcoming, certain "isms." Inceptions toward the supersession of the following "isms" are invariably the first manifestations of the aperspectival world: perspectivism; dualism; materialism; dialectics; positivism; nihilism; existentialism; pragmatism; psychism; vitalism; mechanism; rationalism; and spiritism, to name only a few. This of course assumes that the arational is not being mistaken for the irrational or possibly even for the pre-rational, and we would therefore make particular reference to our remarks in this regard in Part I (p. 147).

From the superabundant materials at our disposal assembled in the course of several decades we shall attempt to infer the indications and the evidence that are the most significant. It is difficult to make the selection, and our neglect of parallel aspects is necessary if we are to avoid turning the discussion into an encyclopedia or a catalogue.

Herewith we have laid the foundations for an understanding of the aperspectival phenomena; systasis and synairesis complete, pervade, and bring together what is not three-dimensionally comprehensible. Temporics as a systatic concept renders perceptible the contents and intensities which are here at stake. With this we can now turn to the manifestations of the aperspectival world.

1
Jean Gebser, Abendländische Wandlung ( Zürich: Oprecht), 1943, p. 64 f.; 2 1945, p. 67; 3 1950, p. 58; Ulstein-Buch No. 107, p. 50; Gesamtausgabe, I, pp. 209-210. In his last published article, Einstein made a statement virtually identical in import to that of de Broglie: "Discovery is not a product of logical thought even though the end result in bound to a logical form" (Das Erfinden ist kein Produkt des logischen Denkens, wenn auch das Endprodukt an die logische Gestalt gebunden ist); see Jean Gebser, "Kulturphilosophie als Methode und Wagnis," Zeitwende: Die neue Furche, 27, 12 ( December, 1956), p. 820; Gesamtausgabe, V/ I, p. 129.
2
Hermann Volk, Das neue Marien-Dogma ( Münster: Regensburg, 1951). p. 7 ff.
3
Nicolai Hartmann, Philosophie der Natur ( Berlin: de Gruyter, 1950), p. 219.

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