INDEX
adjudication, theory of.
connections with theory of law 65-73
distinguished from theory of compliance 40-2
distinguished from theory of law 32, 34, 42-6, 56-8, 65-6, 73, 77
Hart's theory 65-6
sometimes descriptive/explanatory 40-1
sometimes normative 41
anarchist thinking 86-7, 97-8
Aquinas:
on deriving human law from natural law 108-12
on determination of common notions 108-12, 224
and the indexing of law 52
and the institutional nature of human
law 107-13
on the moral force of law 61, 92
and natural law theory 1, 7, 32, 80, 166
arbitration, analogy with law 126-7, 129, 132-3
arguments of principle and policy 248-9
Aristotle111, 224
Augustine:
and the moral force of law 61
and natural law theory 1, 7, 80, 85-6, 166
Austin J.:
and inclusive legal positivism 3, 84, 177, 180, 182
and institutional nature of law 106
on laws not properly so-called 101-2
on legal positivism 1, 9, 32, 168n.
on positive morality 108
and semantic theories of law 104n.
on the separation of law and morals 41, 60, 61n., 64
authority 136
the argument from 123-40
peremptory nature of 124-35, 173
background morality:
in Dworkin44-7
see alsopolitical morality
background rights 47
Baier, A.146
basic intuition, Raz's 77
Baum-Levenbrook, B.201n.
Bayles, M.105
Bentham, J.:
advocates inclusive legal positivism 3, 84, 180, 182
the causal/moral argument 86-98, 103
as legal positivist 9, 60, 168
on limits of sovereignty 177
on natural law 86
on obligation to obey law 13, 64-5
Berkeley, G.148
bias, the argument from 105-6, 140
Bork, R.116-17
Brandt, R.28n., 152n.
Brink, D.40n., 67n., 69n.
on legislative intention 255n.
on plain meaning cases 238n.
Brode, P.69n.
Bronaugh, R.vi, 57n.
Buckley, L. J.37
Burton, S.187n.
Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms 6, 66-7, 71, 115, 135, 139-40, 142-65, 167, 170, 173, 176, 185-6, 204, 208, 219, 224, 226-9, 256
Cardozo, B.66, 214, 216
causal/moral arguments 86-98, 103, 126
Charter societies 95-8, 102, 114-17, 122, 134-5, 139-65, 223, 227-9, 262, 267
Clarke, S.146 n.
cluster concepts 240n.
coercion, legal theories as moral justifications of 13-16, 23-4, 27, 29-30, 32, 59, 61-2, 132
Coleman, J.82n.
on Dworkin's argument from function 189n.

-283-

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Inclusive Legal Positivism
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Acknowledgements vi
  • Contents ix
  • 1: Introduction 1
  • 2 - Theories and Conceptions 9
  • 3 - The Forces of Law 31
  • 4 - Inclusive V. Exclusive Positivism 80
  • 5 - Charter Challenges 142
  • 6 - Hercules 166
  • 7 - Discretion and Legal Theory 191
  • 8 - Morals and the Meaning of Laws 232
  • References 273
  • Table of Cases 281
  • Index 283
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