The Politics of Disappointment: American Elections, 1976-94

By Wilson Carey McWilliams | Go to book overview

the United States also began by asserting the proposition that both our equality and our rights are things that we did not make and about which we have no choice, an unalienable heritage from nature. If people are to come first in public policy, human nature must be given its due. Human beings are more than consumers, and their dignity--their need to be needed-- deserves to be afforded at least equal status with the pursuit of abundance and mastery. Equality implies more than rights; it suggests that, within the limits of our circumstances, we can and should be held accountable to equal standards, offered and expected to live up to the opportunity to contribute to the common life. Even in speech, Bill Clinton's promise of a "new covenant" sounded chords of memory; it remains to be seen how far he can take Americans toward a rediscovery of the Republic.


Notes
1.
"George Herbert Hoover Bush," Economist, 31 October 1992, 30.
2.
David Broder, "Clinton's No Kennedy Either," Washington Post National Weekly, 12-18October1992, 4; Steven Greenhouse, "Clinton's Economic Plan Has a Roosevelt Tone," New York Times, 9 July 1992, 30.
3.
David McCullough, Truman ( New York: Simon and Schuster, 1992), 660-61, 668.
4.
Russell Baker, "All Joy Departed," New York Times, 13 October 1992, A23.
5.
R. W. Apple Jr., "The Economy's Casualty," New York Times, 4 November 1992, A1.
6.
San Francisco Chronicle, 20 August 1992, B3.
7.
Robert D. Hershey Jr., "The Politics of Declining Incomes," New York Times, 9 March 1992, D6.
____________________
the public will be reduced to sullen consumers on one hand and hyperactive careerists on the other. Crossing the Postmodern Divide ( Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1992).

-173-

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The Politics of Disappointment: American Elections, 1976-94
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Preface ix
  • 1 - Introduction 1
  • Notes 12
  • 2 - South Wind, Warning: The Election of 1976 15
  • Notes 34
  • 3 - Presidential Leadership and Changing Parties: The Election of 1980 37
  • Notes 60
  • 4 - Old Virtues, New Magic: The Election of 1984 63
  • Notes 97
  • 5 - Enchantment's Ending: The Election of 1988 101
  • Notes 136
  • 6 - Thinking About Tomorrow Worriedly: The Election of 1992 143
  • Notes 173
  • 7 - Slouching Toward the Millennium: The Election of 1994 183
  • Notes 200
  • Index 203
  • About the Author 211
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