A Dependent People: Newport, Rhode Island in the Revolutionary Era

By Elaine Forman Crane | Go to book overview

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS

The list of people to whom I am indebted for this book is extensive. Since I did not make a note of each person's contribution over the course of research and writing, I fear there will be omissions, and for that I apologize. The following people and institutions, however, have given advice, support, time, and encouragement, for which I am very grateful.

My friend and husband Stephen must receive the largest share of thanks since his part of this adventure consisted of giving up vacations, helping with research, and acting as a sounding board through all the initial writing, revisions, and frustrations that are inevitably part of a book. At the same time, the book would not have been possible without the help of Mrs. Gladys Bolhouse, Curator of Manuscripts at the Newport Historical Society. She knows more about the history of Newport than anyone I have met, and I feel fortunate that I could avail myself of her knowledge of the manuscript collection. The other indispensable person at the Newport Historical Society was the librarian, Mrs. Madeline Wordell, who always seemed to find. the books I needed when I could not find them myself. The rest of the staff at the Newport Historical Society were always helpful, ready to answer questions, and interested in what I was doing. The same can be said for Richard Champlin at the Redwood Library, and Rabbi Theodore Lewis of Touro Synagogue.

The alphabetical typescripts of census and tax data compiled by an unofficial staff member of the Newport Historical Society, Mr. Joseph W. Blaine, were valuable research tools. Since this study of Newport started out as a doctoral dissertation at New York University, it is altogether appropriate to thank my mentor, Professor Patricia Bonomi, as well as the other committee members, David Reimers and Thomas Bender, who helped me to refocus the narrative and argument. The credits at New York University would be incomplete without noting that it was in Bayrd Still's splendid course in urban history that I first became interested in this remarkable colonial town.

Professors John Murrin and Lynne Withey were particularly helpful and encouraging. By reading the manuscript and suggesting that I probe more deeply into certain areas, they sent me in directions I would not have thought of myself. Professors Philip Curtin and Stanley Engerman lent their assistance to the very difficult--and controversial--section on the slave trade, and I thank them both.

-ix-

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A Dependent People: Newport, Rhode Island in the Revolutionary Era
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Abbreviations and Short Titles vi
  • Editorial Note vi
  • Contents vii
  • Tables viii
  • Acknowledgments ix
  • Preface to the Paperback Edition xi
  • Introduction 1
  • Notes 6
  • I - A Good Voyage and Safe Return"" 9
  • 1 - Any Scheme of Trade"" 11
  • 2 - The First Wheel of Commerce"" 16
  • Reflections 34
  • II - An Interdependent People 47
  • 3 - A Mercantile Metropolis 49
  • 4 - The World of the Wealthy 53
  • 5 - Dependent People, Helping Hands 63
  • 6 - The Cruel Sea 69
  • 7 - The Black Community 76
  • 8 - A Lawless Rabble 84
  • Reflections 91
  • III - A Dependent People 107
  • 9 - Economic Arguments and Mob Rule 109
  • 10 - A Town at War with Itself 126
  • Reflections 141
  • Epilogue 157
  • Notes 166
  • Bibliography 169
  • Index 187
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