A Dependent People: Newport, Rhode Island in the Revolutionary Era

By Elaine Forman Crane | Go to book overview

INTRODUCTION

NEWPORT, RHODE ISLAND, may be the oldest city on the North American continent. On the other hand, it may not be. For half a century a controversy has raged over whether Newport was--or was not--the site of a Viking settlement. The believers rest their convictions on an old stone tower which stands somewhat inconspicuously near the center of town, and which bears a striking resemblance to thirteenth-century Norse structures. 1 The skeptics, sad to say, have archaeological evidence on their side, and it is generally agreed today that the tower was built as a mill in the last quarter of the seventeenth century by Governor Benedict Arnold on whose land it stood.

The controversy over the tower is not surprising, however, since Newport has been surrounded by controversy for a good part of its history. Indeed, its very founding stemmed from a dispute between certain dissidents and the inflexible founding fathers of Massachusetts Bay. 2 In 1638 several alleged Antinomian sympathizers, led by John Clarke and William Coddington, avoided certain banishment from the Bay Colony by following Roger Williams into the wilderness of Rhode Island. Williams negotiated the purchase of Aquidneck Island from the Indians for Coddington's group and watched as they established a toe hold at Portsmouth on the northern end of the island. In the following year, Ann Hutchinson's followers wrested political control from this small band, and because it was easier to move on than fight, Coddington's group paddled to the southern end of Aquidneck where they established a more substantial foothold quite close to Newport harbor. It is unlikely that this particular location was a happy accident, since the settlers were aware of the harbor's excellent reputation and growing use in the coastal trade. Satisfied that this was a promising spot for a permanent settlement, these nine men "agreed and ordered, that the Plantation now begun at this South West end of the Island shall be called Newport...." 3

By midsummer 1639 plans were well under way to lay out the town's streets, houses, and highways, and by the end of the year, commissioners had already approached Portsmouth with plans for a union of the two Aquidneck communities. A year later the plan was implemented, with William Cod

-1-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
A Dependent People: Newport, Rhode Island in the Revolutionary Era
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Abbreviations and Short Titles vi
  • Editorial Note vi
  • Contents vii
  • Tables viii
  • Acknowledgments ix
  • Preface to the Paperback Edition xi
  • Introduction 1
  • Notes 6
  • I - A Good Voyage and Safe Return"" 9
  • 1 - Any Scheme of Trade"" 11
  • 2 - The First Wheel of Commerce"" 16
  • Reflections 34
  • II - An Interdependent People 47
  • 3 - A Mercantile Metropolis 49
  • 4 - The World of the Wealthy 53
  • 5 - Dependent People, Helping Hands 63
  • 6 - The Cruel Sea 69
  • 7 - The Black Community 76
  • 8 - A Lawless Rabble 84
  • Reflections 91
  • III - A Dependent People 107
  • 9 - Economic Arguments and Mob Rule 109
  • 10 - A Town at War with Itself 126
  • Reflections 141
  • Epilogue 157
  • Notes 166
  • Bibliography 169
  • Index 187
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 196

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.