The College Influence on Student Character: An Exploratory Study in Selected Colleges and Universities Made for the Committee for the Study of Character Development in Education

By Edward D. Eddy Jr.; Mary Louise Parkhurst et al. | Go to book overview

3. The Concept of Teaching

It seems unfortunate that the most important part of what ought to be reported cannot be, for lack of any tool of evaluation. Having been even busier than usual at classroom activities, we would ask: To what end? We believe we have raised some important questions with enough impact so that some of our students have started seeking answers. We believe we have encouraged some of them to reject simple answers to complex problems and to recognize the labor and discomfort that are often the price that must be paid for understanding.

With perhaps a considerable number of students who have attended our classes, the results may well have been less fruitful than they expected. Our majors have, however, matured in a way one would wish and we like to think their association with us and with each other in our classes helped. To remove our bias, we can only say: Here are our seniors; think back to when they were freshmen and sophomores. If there is a change for the better, we probably had something to do with it; it represents in large part the results of our activities in teaching that particular college generation.

IN THIS WAY and with these mixed emotions, a department chairman in one of the institutions made his report to the dean. His thoughtful, bittersweet statement reflects the searching we found in good teachers everywhere to discover that spark which, in its mysterious way, lends a quality of excellence to a student's education.

In this chapter we explore the concept of teaching. The great majority of students in all the colleges and universities which we visited spoke frequently and freely of the impact of the good teacher on their lives. We mention "good" because it is obvious from the record of their conversations that mere teaching by itself guarantees no solid reaction. Only under certain conditions and only when certain qualities are present in the man and his

-40-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The College Influence on Student Character: An Exploratory Study in Selected Colleges and Universities Made for the Committee for the Study of Character Development in Education
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 190

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.