Poetry and Revolution: An Anthology of British and Irish Verse, 1625-1660

By Peter Davidson | Go to book overview

PREFACE

The poetry of the mid- seventeenth century is unavoidably the product of social, intellectual, and personal crisis and change. Apart from a few unassailable figures who represent a continuing and strengthening poetic tradition, it was until recently one of the least studied phases of poetry written in the British islands, and yet, paradoxically, one which speaks eloquently and in satisfyingly diverse voices to the late twentieth-century reader.

The first part of this preface sets out the kinds of reasons which have determined the selection of texts for this book. It also discusses some of the difficulties of trying to pack some representation of a period of unparalleled richness and diversity into a generous, but finite, anthology. This first section also should serve to welcome and reassure the reader by offering maps for the exploration of the selection of poems. The most important element in this is to stress that the anthology is not attempting to be rebarbative, strange, other: much of the point of its diversity is to enrich the context of the most familiar poems of the time, and to present them freshly in at least an attempted replica of their original settings.

The second part of this preface explores the ways in which the canon of mid- seventeenth-century poetry has been shaped. This is not just a catalogue of the sometimes arbitrary decisions of the publisher and the academic: it involves ideas of history and historiography, for this has long been recognized as the period where literature and events are more visibly interwound than at any other time in the history of the British islands. This section will argue that historical fiction itself has played a key part in forming ideas of this period of war and revolution, influencing the choices of anthologists and editors who have made their own 'historical fictions' of the Civil War.


1. THIS ANTHOLOGY: SELECTION, PRESENTATION, ANNOTATION.

This anthology represents something of a fresh start. Editors, however much they think they may be examining a body of past writing afresh and without prejudice, cannot avoid bringing with them the agenda and anxieties of their own times. To pretend otherwise would be to engage in self-deception and in public fraud. But an attempt has been made not only to look over what might be called the old canon of mid-seventeenth-century poetry, but also to look, as if for the first time, at disparate and divergent voices. One of the most important things about the period of transition and upheaval with which this book deals is that those divergent voices become increasingly public and articulate.

-xxxi-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Poetry and Revolution: An Anthology of British and Irish Verse, 1625-1660
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 640

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.