Poetry and Revolution: An Anthology of British and Irish Verse, 1625-1660

By Peter Davidson | Go to book overview

APPENDIX 2
INDEX OF CONTEMPORARY NAMES

Alasdair mac Colla Chiotaich Alasdair mac Colla (MacDonald) (c. 1610-47). Younger son of Colla Ciotach (Colkitto) of Iona, and Colonsay, a famous MacDonald warrior. He took service under Raghnall, second Earl of Antrim, after his father Colla Ciotach had been captured and imprisoned by the Earl of Argyll, and was sent to Scotland by him at the head of a chiefly MacDonald army in 1644 to fight for the King, and against the Earl of Argyll. He joined forces with Montrose, and fought under him for a year of astounding victories all over central and eastern Scotland. He and his MacDonalds separated from Montrose in the autumn of 1645 in order to pursue their vendetta against the Campbells, which enabled the Covenanting forces to defeat Montrose at Philiphaugh. Alasdair continued to ravage in Scotland until 1647, when Argyll finally managed to chase him back to Ireland. He was killed later that year fighting for the Catholic confederacy at Cnoc na nOs in Munster.

Anglesey, Countess of Elizabeth Sheldon, wife of Christopher Villiers, younger brother of the Duke of Buckingham. In 1623 Villiers was created Earl of Anglesey and also granted the remaining forests and lands at Chippenham Forest, or Pewsam, where the disafforestation, completed the following year, was extremely unpopular with local farmers. (191, 251)

Argyll Gilleasbaig Caoch, or Archibald Campbell, Lord Lorne and eighth Earl of Argyll ( 1607-61). He was leader of the powerful and predatory Clan Campbell, and a leading Presbyterian nobleman. He and his clan were hated by Gaelic-speaking Catholics. His main power-base was in Argyll, effectively a buffer state between the Highlands and the Lowlands, from whence the Campbells gradually extended their hegemony over their Highland neighbours. He emerged as a leader of the anti-Royalist forces in Scotland, though he was noted for his personal cowardice, particularly evident at Inverlochy, where he escaped by boat, leaving his clansmen to be cut to pieces by Alasdair mac Colla and Montrose. He was executed by Charles II shortly after the Restoration. (323, 324, 340)

Atkins, Alderman Sir Edward Atkins ( 1587-1669), baron of the exchequer from 1645. He was defence counsel for Prynne at his Star Chamber trial for libelling the Queen in his Histriomastix. Atkins served the Commonwealth and Cromwell, but was knighted at the Restoration, which suggests that both sides regarded him as a man of honour (320)

B-- Robert Greville, Lord Brooke. (282)

Bellarmine Roberto Francesco Romolo Bellarmine ( 1542-1621), an Italian cardinal, and a powerful controversialist in defence of Catholic orthodoxy against Protestant theologians. (306)

Black Prince, The ( 1330-76) Son of Edward III; great English leader against the French in the Hundred Years' War. So called both for his ferocity as a general, and for his black campaign armour. Father of Richard II. (215)

Booker John Booker ( 1603-67), astrologer. His first published work was Telescopium Uranum in 1631. His great fame was founded on predicting the deaths of Gustavus Adolphus and the Elector Palatine. He was appointed licenser of mathematical books, and published a successful rhymed Dutch Fortune Teller in 1650. (243)

-585-

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