Poetry and Revolution: An Anthology of British and Irish Verse, 1625-1660

By Peter Davidson | Go to book overview

APPENDIX 3
BIOGRAPHICAL NOTES ON AUTHORS

Anna Alcox Almost nothing is known of Anna Alcox. She was the child of a Catholic family, living in the 1650s at Alveston, near Bristol. She was born in about 1645, and composed her two surviving poems when still a child. (163)

Philip Ayres Born in 1638, and educated at In the 1660s he accompanied Sir Richard Fanshawe's Westminster School and St John's College, Oxford. embassy to Spain. In later life, he was a friend of Dryden's, but composed all his surviving work very much in the style of the mid- century. His Lyric Poems were published in 1687, his Emblemata Amatoria in 1683. He died in 1712. (78)

Joseph Beaumont Joseph Beaumont was born at Hadleigh in Suffolk in 1616. He entered Peterhouse, Cambridge, in 1631, proceeding to his MA in 1638. He was a friend of Richard Crashaw (qv). He was ejected for his royalist sympathies in 1644. At the Restoration he was appointed a chaplain to Charles II and in 1663 he became Master of Peterhouse. He died in November 1699 and was buried in Peterhouse chapel. (147, 148)

Samson Briggs Samson Briggs was born at Epsom in Surrey, and educated at Eton, entering King's College in Cambridge in October 1630. He became a Fellow of King's in 1633. He was 'slaine in the King's Armie at the siege of Gloucester 1644' and 'his aged father, Rector of Fulmere, in Buckinghamshire, with extreme grief for the death of his son became distracted'. Only two of his poems were published in his lifetime, neither under his name. (53, 105, 213)

Alexander Brome Alexander Brome was born in 1620, and became an attorney in the Lord Mayor's Court or the Court of the King's Bench. He was a convinced royalist in the Civil Wars. He wrote and edited plays, and compiled a variorum edition of translations of Horace in 1666. He is one of the very few poets of the mid-century who wrote in anything like the 'Cavalier' style imagined by the nineteenth century. (110, 111, 218, 300, 301, 303, 304, 305)

Richard Brome Richard Brome, no relation to Alexander, was born about 1590, and was for a time a servant to Ben Jonson, and as a playwright, echoes his dramatic style and satirical interests. A Joviall Crew, which was acted on the eve of civil war in 1641, is both an uncomfortable allegory of an England sliding into chaos and a humorous romance, showing an escapist nostalgia for an England populated by generous and adventurous aristocrats and carefree roving gypsies. Other plays satirize contemporary society and especially the rapacious behaviour of the court. Brome was a thriving and popular playwright whose career was cut off by the closing of the theatres; he died c. 1653. (232)

Thomas Carew Thomas Carew was born in Kent in 1594-5, and educated at Merton College, Oxford, and the Middle Temple and held thereafter various diplomatic posts until in 1630 he received a court appointment as Sewer in Ordinary to the King. He wrote the masque Coelum Britannicum in 1634. He was with Charles's expedition against Scotland in the first Bishops' War. He died in March 1640. (16, 17, 18, 88, 89, 126, 179, 180, 181)

William Cartwright William Cartwright was born in 1611 in Northway, Gloucestershire, and educated at Christ Church, Oxford, taking his MA in 1635. His play The Royal Slave was performed before Charles I and Henrietta Maria in 1636, a repeat performance being ordered at Hampton Court. He took orders in 1638. His oratory was much commended, and he preached the victory sermon after the battle of Edgehill in 1642. During the siege of Oxford he was active

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