Adam Bede

By George Eliot; Valentine Cunningham | Go to book overview

CHAPTER XV
THE TWO BED-CHAMBERS

HETTY and Dinah both slept in the second story, in rooms adjoining each other, meagrely furnished rooms, with no blinds to shut out the light, which was now beginning to gather new strength from the rising of the moon--more than enough strength to enable Hetty to move about and undress with perfect comfort. She could see quite well the pegs in the old painted linenpress* on which she hung her hat and gown; she could see the head of every pin on her red cloth pin-cushion; she could see a reflection of herself in the old-fashioned looking-glass, quite as distinct as was needful, considering that she had only to brush her hair and put on her nightcap. A queer old looking-glass! Hetty got into an ill-temper with it almost every time she dressed. It had been considered a handsome glass in its day, and had probably been bought into the Poyser family a quarter of a century before, at a sale of genteel household furniture. Even now an auctioneer could say something for it: it had a great deal of tarnished gilding about it; it had a firm mahogany base, well supplied with drawers, which opened with a decided jerk, and sent the contents leaping out from the farthest corners, without giving you the trouble of reaching them; above all, it had a brass candle-socket on each side, which would give it an aristocratic air to the very last. But Hetty objected to it because it had numerous dim blotches sprinkled over the mirror, which no rubbing would remove, and because, instead of swinging backwards and forwards, it was fixed in an upright position, so that she could only get one good view of her head and neck, and that was to be had only by sitting down on a low chair before her dressing-table. And the dressing-table was no dressing-table at all, but a small old chest of drawers, the most awkward thing in the world to sit down before, for the big brass handles quite hurt her knees, and she couldn't get near the glass at all comfortably. But devout worshippers never allow inconveniences to prevent them from performing their religious rites, and Hetty

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Adam Bede
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Adam Bede i
  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Introduction vii
  • Note on the Text xli
  • Select Bibliography xliii
  • A Chronology of George Eliot xlv
  • Title Page 1
  • Contents 3
  • Book First 5
  • Chapter I- The Workshop 5
  • Chapter II- The Preaching 14
  • 33- Chapter III after the Preaching 33
  • Chapter IV- Home and Its Sorrows 39
  • Chapter V- The Rector 54
  • Chapter VI- The Hall Farm 71
  • Chapter IX- Hetty''s World 96
  • Chapter X- Dinah Visits Lisbeth 103
  • Chapter XII- In the Wood 124
  • Chapter XIII- Evening in the Wood 135
  • Chapter XIV- The Return Home 140
  • Chapter XV- The Two Bed-Chambers 149
  • Chapter XVI- Links 162
  • Book Second 175
  • Chapter XVII- In Which the Story Pauses a Little 175
  • Chapter XVIII- Church 185
  • Chapter XIX- Adam on a Working Day 207
  • Chapter XX- Adam Visits the Hall Farm 214
  • Book Third 247
  • Chapter XXII- Going to the Birthday Feast 247
  • Chapter XXIII- Dinner-Time 258
  • Chapter XXIV- The Health-Drinking 263
  • Chapter XXV- The Games 271
  • Book Fourth 291
  • Chapter XXVII 291
  • Chapter XXVIII- A Dilemma 302
  • Chapter XXIX- The Next Morning 310
  • Chapter XXX- The Delivery of the Letter 318
  • Chapter XXXII- Mrs Poyser ''Has Her Say Out'' 341
  • Chapter XXXIII- More Links 350
  • Chapter XXXIV- The Betrothal 357
  • Chapter XXXV- The Hidden Dread 362
  • Book Fifth 369
  • Chapter XXXVI- The Journey in Hope 369
  • Chapter XXXVII- The Journey in Despair 378
  • Chapter XXXVIII- The Quest 390
  • Chapter XXXIX- The Tidings 404
  • Chapter XLII- The Morning of the Trial 425
  • Chapter XLIII- The Verdict 430
  • Chapter XLIV- Arthur''s Return 437
  • Chapter XLV- In the Prison 445
  • Chapter XLVI- The Hours of Suspense 456
  • Book Sixth 473
  • Chapter XLIX- At the Hall Farm 473
  • Chapter L- In the Cottage 483
  • Chapter LI Sunday Morning 494
  • Chapter LII Adam and Dinah 506
  • Chapter LIII the Harvest Supper 515
  • Chapter Liv the Meeting on the Hill 528
  • Chapter LV Marriage Bells 533
  • Epilogue 537
  • Appendix 1- George Eliot''s History of Adam Bede 541
  • Appendix 2- The Crime, Trial, and Execution of Mary Voce- Three Contemporary Broadsheets 544
  • Explanatory Notes 554
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