Love in a Wood; The Gentleman Dancing-Master; The Country Wife; The Plain Dealer

By William Wycherley; Peter Dixon | Go to book overview

A CHRONOLOGY OF
WILLIAM WYCHERLEY

Dates in parenthesis after the tides of the plays are those of the first recorded performances, which may (or may not) be the premières.

1641 Born, (?) 28 March, probably at Manor Farm, Whitchurch, Hamp-
shire. Educated at home ( London and Whitchurch), and at school in Shrewsbury.
1655(?) Sent to France to further his education. Introduced to courtly circle
of the Marquise de Montausier, near Angoulême. Converted to
Catholicism.
1659 Returns to England. Enters Inner Temple, to study law.
1660 Registers as a student at Bodleian Library, Oxford, and rejoins
Church of England. Re-enters Inner Temple on to November.
1662 With Earl of Arran's regiment of guards in Ireland. (?) Organizes
Christmas Revels at Inner Temple.
1664 (?) To Madrid in January with the English ambassador.
1665 Takes part in naval battle of Harwich (2nd Dutch War), 3 June.
1669 Hero and Leander (burlesque poem) published.
1671 Love in a Wood produced, probably in March, at the Theatre Royal,
Bridges Street; published 1672. Brief affair with Duchess of Cleve-
land. Admitted to circle of court wits, including Duke of Bucking-
ham.
1672 The Gentleman Dancing-Master, Dorset Garden Theatre (6 Feb-
ruary); published 1673. In June is commissioned captain-lieutenant
in Duke of Buckingham's regiment of foot.
1673 On active service (3rd Dutch War); stationed in Isle of Wight.
1674 Receives captain's commission in February, and leaves army.
1675 The Country Wife, Drury Lane Theatre (12 January); published later
in year.
1676 The Plain Dealer, Drury Lane Theatre (11 December), published 1677.
1678 Liaison (? May) with Countess of Drogheda. Severe illness (fever?
encephalitis?), causing loss of memory. The king sends him to
Montpellier in the autumn to recuperate.
1679 Returns to England in spring. Offered post of tutor to the Duke of Richmond (the king's illegitimate son), with handsome salary. ? 29
September marries the recently widowed Countess of Drogheda.
Loses the king's favour and the tutorship. Beginning of prolonged
lawsuits over his wife's debts and (later) her first husband's will.

-xxxiii-

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Love in a Wood; The Gentleman Dancing-Master; The Country Wife; The Plain Dealer
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • The Country Wife and Other Plays i
  • Oxford English Drama ii
  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Acknowledgements vi
  • Introduction vii
  • Note on Staging xxii
  • Note on the Texts xxv
  • Select Bibliography xxix
  • A Chronology of William Wycherley xxxiii
  • Love in a Wood,∘ - Or, St James's Park 1
  • [dedicatory Epistle] to Her Grace the Duchess of Cleveland.∘ 2
  • Prologue∘ 5
  • Epilogue 95
  • The Gentleman Dancing-Master 97
  • Prologue 99
  • Epilogue Spoken by Flirt 189
  • The Country Wife 191
  • Prologue Spoken by Mr Hart 193
  • Epilogue Spoken by Mrs Knepp∘ 282
  • The Plain Dealer∘ 283
  • [dedicatory Epistle] to My Lady B-----∘ 289
  • Prologue Spoken by the Plain Dealer 290
  • Epilogue 399
  • Explanatory Notes 400
  • Glossary 467
  • Selection of Oxford World's Classics 487
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