Love in a Wood; The Gentleman Dancing-Master; The Country Wife; The Plain Dealer

By William Wycherley; Peter Dixon | Go to book overview

GLOSSARY
à d'autres 'tell me another'
above more than, 'gone': PD, 5.2.358
abroad out, out of doors, out of the house (opposite to 'at home'), be seen in public
abuse deceive, laugh at, make a laughing-stock of
action acting
adad mild oath (variant of 'By God')
address skill, dexterity
admiration wondering approval, astonishment
admire marvel at, with foolish naïvety
adonde where
advice considered statement of opinion
affected with partial to; tainted with
affection partiality
again in reply, in return, back
agree make up a difference, settle a price, draw up a contract
agreeable delightfully, agreeably, suitably
ague malarial fever
alcove recessed part of bedchamber where bed is placed
alderman member of the governing body of the City of London; loosely, a City worthy or businessman
all a case exactly the same thing
all one neither here nor them, 'it amounts to the same thing, just the same
allayn. check; v. dampen, spoil one's pleasure
alley street in red-light district
allow approve
allowance toleration, approval
amuse delude
and if
anon by and by, soon
an't if it
apish affected
apostle spoons silver spoons with figures of apostles on handle-ends
appertain belong by right
appoint arrange
apprehend fear, be frightened of; grasp, appreciate
apprehension fear, suspicion, notion, understanding
apprenti apprentice
appurtenances (legal) appendages of a piece of property
arithmetical fussily precise, pedantic
arrant downright, notorious, utter
articles legal conditions and terms
as equally, suchlike
assured certain, confident
attorney lawyer empowered to draw up legal documents and prepare client's case for counsel in a court of common law
awful terrifying
babies dolls
back on the return voyage
backward back at the back of the house
baffle perplex, hoodwink humiliate
ball party
ballet pantomime with dancing, the subject often exotic or bizarre
banquet refreshments, especially dessert of fruit and wine
barefaced needing no concealment, not ashamed of itself
barely without corroboration, as a mere assertion
base illegitimate
basilisk fabulous reptile, half-cock, half-serpent, whose took was fatal
bate subtract from the agreement
bawdn. brothel-keeper, pimp, go-between; v. play the go-between
beakers goblets
bear endure
beastliness disgusting behaviour; monstrous shape
beat up pay an unwelcome visit, disturb

-467-

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Love in a Wood; The Gentleman Dancing-Master; The Country Wife; The Plain Dealer
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • The Country Wife and Other Plays i
  • Oxford English Drama ii
  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Acknowledgements vi
  • Introduction vii
  • Note on Staging xxii
  • Note on the Texts xxv
  • Select Bibliography xxix
  • A Chronology of William Wycherley xxxiii
  • Love in a Wood,∘ - Or, St James's Park 1
  • [dedicatory Epistle] to Her Grace the Duchess of Cleveland.∘ 2
  • Prologue∘ 5
  • Epilogue 95
  • The Gentleman Dancing-Master 97
  • Prologue 99
  • Epilogue Spoken by Flirt 189
  • The Country Wife 191
  • Prologue Spoken by Mr Hart 193
  • Epilogue Spoken by Mrs Knepp∘ 282
  • The Plain Dealer∘ 283
  • [dedicatory Epistle] to My Lady B-----∘ 289
  • Prologue Spoken by the Plain Dealer 290
  • Epilogue 399
  • Explanatory Notes 400
  • Glossary 467
  • Selection of Oxford World's Classics 487
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