Hidden Futures: Death and Immortality in Ancient Egypt, Anatolia, the Classical, Biblical and Arabic-Islamic World

By J. M. Bremer; Theo P.J. Van Den Hout et al. | Go to book overview

APPENDIX
Aen. 1.613-30 Od. 10.323-35
Sidonian Dido was amazed, first at the
sight of the hero, then at his strange
misfortune, and thus her lips made
utterance: "What fate pursues thee,
goddess-born, amidst such perils?
What violence drives thee to savage
shores? Art thou that Aeneas, whom
gracious Venus bore to Dardanian
Anchises by the wave of Phrygian
Simois? Yea, I myself remember well
Teucer's coming to Sidon; when exiled
from his native land, he sought a new
kingdom by aid of Belus; my father
Belus was then wasting rich Cyprus,
and held it under his victorious sway.
From that time on, the fall of the
Trojan city has been known to me;
known, too, thine own name and the
Pelasgian kings. Even their foe often
lauded the Teucrians with highest
praise and would have it that he was
sprung from the Teucrians' ancient
stock. Come therefore, sirs, and pass
within our halls. Me, too, has a like
fortune driven through many toils, and
willed that at last I should find rest in
this land. Not ignorant of ill do I learn
to befriend the unhappy.
'Who on earth are you?' she asked.
'What parents begot, what city bred
such a man? I am amazed to see you
take my poison and suffer no magic
change. For never before have I known
a man who could resist that drug once
he had taken it and swallowed it down.
You must have a heart in your breast
that is proof against all enchantment. I
am sure you are Odysseus, the man
whom nothing defeats, the man whom
the Giant-slayer with the golden wand
always told me to expect here on his
way back from Troy in his good black
ship. But I beg you now to put up your
sword and come with me to my bed, so
that in love and sleep we may team to
trust one another.'
Aen. 6.83-97
O thou that at last hast fulfilled the
great perils of the sea -- yet by land
more grievous woes await thee -- into
the realm of Lavinium the sons of
Dardanus shall come -- relieve thy
heart of this care -- yet they shall not
also joy in their coming. Wars, grim
wars I see, and Tiber foaming with
streams of blood. A Simois thou shalt
not lack, nor a Xanthus, nor a Doric
camp. Even now another Achilles is
raised up in Latium, he, too, god

-143-

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