Minority Shareholders' Remedies

By Elizabeth J. Boros | Go to book overview

2
Common Complaints of Minority Shareholders

One of the pillars of company law is the principle of majority rule. Both at the level of the board of directors and the company in general meeting, company decisions are generally1 decided by a simple majority vote. But while the concept of majority rule is fundamental, it carries with it the potential for abuse of power. This book is concerned with the position of minority shareholders where the company's controllers are taking advantage of their more powerful position to oppress the minority.

At the outset, it is necessary to draw certain distinctions, both as to the nature of minority shareholders' complaints and as to the nature of the company in which they occur. Indeed, these two factors are interrelated, since the nature of the company will determine whether and to what extent minority shareholders are affected by particular forms of conduct.

At one end of the spectrum of company types is the listed public company. Here risk bearing and management are separated, and most shareholder complaints therefore relate to dissatisfaction with management. They may stem from disagreements over policy matters, charges of inefficiency or negligence, or, more seriously, that the controllers are profiting at the expense of the company. The one advantage that minority shareholders in listed companies have when faced with these situations is that in many cases they will be able to avoid the problem by selling their shares.

Nevertheless, there are some situations where disposal of their shares will not be a satisfactory option. For example, the conduct of the controllers may have depressed the value of the shares, the minority may not wish to dispose of their stake for personal or strategic reasons, or a sale may not be viable because the shares were purchased as part of an indexed fund.2 The aggrieved shareholders will then have to look to other remedies.

At the other end of the spectrum are corporate quasi-partnerships.

____________________
1
Special majorities may be prescribed for certain decisions either by the articles or by statute. For example a three-quarters majority is prescribed by statute in respect of a resolution altering the articles of association: s. 9, CA 1985 (UK), s. 176, CL (Aust).
2
See Chapter 3 Section 3(1)(d).

-5-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Minority Shareholders' Remedies
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Preface v
  • Acknowledgments vi
  • Contents vii
  • Abbreviations viii
  • Table of Cases xi
  • Table of Statutes xxxvii
  • Regulations and Statutory Instruments *
  • Part I - The Problem 1
  • I - Introduction 3
  • 2 - Common Complaints of Minority Shareholders 5
  • Part II - Prevention 11
  • 3 - Self-Help in Listed Companies 13
  • Contents 13
  • 4 - Self-Help in Quasi-Partnership and Joint Venture Companies 63
  • Contents 63
  • 5 - Self-Help in Other Companies 107
  • Part III - Remedy 109
  • 6 - The Oppression/Unfair Prejudice Remedy 111
  • 7 - Winding Up 166
  • Contents 166
  • 8 - Common Law Relief 183
  • Contents 183
  • 9 - Application of Litigious Remedies to Identified Complaints 218
  • Contents 218
  • 10 - Compulsory Acquisition 260
  • Contents 260
  • Part IV - Conclusions 317
  • II - Overview and Conclusions 319
  • Contents 319
  • Index 331
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 340

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

    Already a member? Log in now.