PREFACE

THIS volume, like "Whither Mankind," is a view of mod­ ern civilization, but from an entirely different angle. "Whither Mankind" advanced the thesis that what is called Western Civilization, as distinguished from other cultures, is in reality a technological civilization, resting at bottom on science and machinery. In its pages this thesis was discussed and developed mainly by specialists in the humanities -- law, econom­ ics, and ethics. "Outsiders looking in" reported their findings and mpressions.

To a group of prominent engineers in New York "Whither Mankind" appeared to be a challenge to their whole profession. Are not technologies thinkers as well as doers? Are they indif­ ferent to the human aspects of their revolutionary activities? Do they not reflect upon the upshot and outcome of their work? After raising these questions, the group of techniques just men­ tioned replied that the real leaders of the machine age, men of sci­ entific training and practical occupation, also recognize their responsibility for the future of humanity, see in the materials now at hand the promise of great advances for mankind, and are already seriously considering the drift of things and the nature of the readjustments necessary for a better future.

Hence this inquest. In the pages that follow a group of scien­ tists and engineers inquire into the dynamics of their labors with particular reference to the human aspects. It is a case now of the "insiders looking out." The authors of "Whither Mankind" re­ viewed the past and surveyed their present. The authors of this book are not concerned with history but with prospects, with work in course. The result is a significant volume -- significant as a dis­ closure of technical tendencies, as a sign of deep stirrings among the members of the engineering fraternity, as the promise of a wider

-v-

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Toward Civilization
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Preface v
  • Contents vii
  • Introduction 1
  • I- The New Age and the New Man 21
  • II- Science Lights the Torch 38
  • III- The Spirit of Invention in an Industrial Civilization 47
  • IV- Power 69
  • V- Transportation 98
  • VI- Communication 120
  • VII- Modern Industry and Management 137
  • VIII- Agriculture 159
  • IX- Engineering in Government 176
  • X- Art in the Market Place - The Industrial Arts in the Machine Age 196
  • XI- The Machine and Architecture 213
  • XII- Work and Leisure 232
  • III- Education and the New Age 253
  • XIV- Machine Industry and Idealism 273
  • XV- Spirit and Culture under the Machine 282
  • XVI- Summary- The Planning of Civilization 297
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