I -- THE NEW AGE AND THE NEW MAN

By RALPH E. FLANDERS


I

IN SEARCHING for the forces which have shaped our modern world we shall find three that have exerted a decisive power. They are first, the freedom of thought which derived from the Renaissance and the Reformation; second, the development of science and the scientific method; and, third, the similar but separate growth of invention.

All of these had stirred the human imagination as early as the first years of the sixteenth century. Yet if the printing press was already busy then and Luther was soon to speak, and if the first crude microscopes and the first of modern philosophy were not far away, the form of the earlier world was still to envelop mankind for centuries. Bacon, writing his amazing "Novum Organum" in the early 1600's, saw about him a world awaiting deliverance, and his somewhat inarticulate prophecies have long since then been exceeded by truth. The Renaissance world was linked unit to unit by muddy highways and fragile wooden ships. It was the slave of infinite infections, heatless and lightless houses, man-power implements, and news that went by boat or horseback. The modern world of concrete roads, intricate factories, steam-heated offices and houses, words tossed by air or wire across seas and continents, armed scientific battalions routing pollutions and fevers -- this world would have seemed a sun to its candle, a thunderbolt to its crude leaden bullet.

The modern world began its really firm and rapid growth in the eighteenth century. In science, Copernicus and Galileo had de-

-21-

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Toward Civilization
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Preface v
  • Contents vii
  • Introduction 1
  • I- The New Age and the New Man 21
  • II- Science Lights the Torch 38
  • III- The Spirit of Invention in an Industrial Civilization 47
  • IV- Power 69
  • V- Transportation 98
  • VI- Communication 120
  • VII- Modern Industry and Management 137
  • VIII- Agriculture 159
  • IX- Engineering in Government 176
  • X- Art in the Market Place - The Industrial Arts in the Machine Age 196
  • XI- The Machine and Architecture 213
  • XII- Work and Leisure 232
  • III- Education and the New Age 253
  • XIV- Machine Industry and Idealism 273
  • XV- Spirit and Culture under the Machine 282
  • XVI- Summary- The Planning of Civilization 297
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