The Mind of Max Scheler: The First Comprehensive Guide Based on the Complete Works

By Manfred S. Frings | Go to book overview

CHAPTER I
ETHICS OF VALUES AND THE PERSON

Prefatory Remark

It amounts to a startling fact that the scope of the philosophical literature of our century--far exceeding that of any previous century-- shows only a modest occupation with the foundation of the discipline of ethics itself. Most philosophers of rank whom one associates with this century's philosophy either refer to ethics parenthetically, implicitly, or look at it as a discipline subordinated to their own thought.

The lack of research into the foundations of ethics amounts to a striking, perhaps frightening, phenomenon. No doubt, in an age of technology, steadily intensifying internationalization and communication among peoples, there is dire need for philosophers to look into the origins of the present disarray of values and their perceptions. The recent growth of specialized professional ethics of business, medicine, law and others, did not, despite their usefulness for society, contribute to uncovering these origins, because to touch upon the foundations of ethics was not their goal.

Yet this charge that the majority of the great thinkers of our time did not concern themselves with ethics as they should have can also be countered in light of the history of ethics itself since ancient Greece. This history does indeed show unrelenting endeavors of ethicists to find ways of improving the moral status of the human race of their time. Aristotle, Bentham, Brentano, W.James, Kant, Meinong, Mill, G.E. Moore, Rashdall, Socrates and Spinoza, to mention only some, provide us with rich resources for assessing the moral problems of their times. And the same intention, it can further be argued, has also been pursued by a number of more recent thinkers such as R.Brandt, W.Frankena, N.Hartmann, Ortega, H.Reiner, P.Ricoeur and, of course, the thinker whose ethics we are going to present here in some detail. All of them did advance their own views on the discipline of ethics itself, but they also revisited some perennial questions and attempted to solve them in light of the day. All of them focused, more or less, on the ultimate moral question of ethics, namely, what the human being, at any of its moments and situations, ought to do. As we shall see, Max Scheler came forth with an entirely novel, hitherto only little-known but most challenging conceptualization of the

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The Mind of Max Scheler: The First Comprehensive Guide Based on the Complete Works
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page *
  • Table of Contents 1
  • Preface 5
  • Introduction 9
  • Chapter I- Ethics of Values and the Person 19
  • Prefatory Remark 19
  • Chapter II- Phenomenological Intersubjectivity 81
  • Prefatory Remark 81
  • Chapter III- The Four Social Forms of Togetherness with Other Persons 99
  • Prefatory Remark 99
  • Chapter IV- Phenomenology of Religious Experience 121
  • Prefatory Remark 121
  • Chapter V- Ressentiment 143
  • Prefactory Remark 143
  • Prefatory Remark 167
  • Preface 167
  • Chapter VII- Subliminal Phenomenology 181
  • Prefatory Remark 181
  • Chapter VIII- The Forms of Knowledge and Society 193
  • Preface 193
  • Chapter IX- The Last Vision- The Becoming of God, of World, and the Cosmic Place of Human Existence Prefatory Remark 249
  • Bibliographies 299
  • Index of Proper Names 315
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