The Mind of Max Scheler: The First Comprehensive Guide Based on the Complete Works

By Manfred S. Frings | Go to book overview

CHAPTER II
PHENOMENOLOGICAL INTERSUBJECTIVITY.

Prefatory Remark

Any system of ethics that does not furnish a full account of how other human beings are given and experienced within one's own self must remain deficient because an account of moral comportment must be given with regard to its relation to and bearing on other persons.

Throughout the previous chapter it had been implied that moral acts fall into two classes--just as all acts of consciousness, according to Scheler, must be divided.

The two classes of acts are solitary and social. Acts of consciousness are either solitary or social acts. Solitary acts pertain only to the individual who executes them. Acts of conscience such as those of repentance, for example, are often solitary when they point to what one ought not to have done with respect to oneself. This class of acts contains all acts of communion with oneself. By contrast, social acts are exclusively directed toward other persons. The act of comparing, for example, pertains to another self, whether present or absent, without which no comparing could take place. Of course, both classes of acts can also fall under their opposite classification. An act of conscience may also pertain to others which I have hurt; and an act of comparing can also pertain to my own self when I compare my present self to what I should have been but was not.

In what follows, we will clarify how others are given as others and therefore, how human communities and associations are the result of the phenomenological givenness of others in social acts. This account must be furnished because ethics, too, is rooted in moral intersubjective experiences. The account of how others are given to the self requires two clarifications: (a) a clarification of the matter as contained in Scheler book: The Nature of Sympathy, and (b) a clarification of the phenomenological bases of sociology contained in Formalism.


The Primordiality of the Other in Emotive Experience

1) The Genesis of the Problem of the Other in Philosophical Literature

The first edition of Scheler book on sympathy appeared in 1913, its title in translation being Phenomenology of Sympathetic Feelings and of Love and Hate. The details of the text were introduced in the United

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The Mind of Max Scheler: The First Comprehensive Guide Based on the Complete Works
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page *
  • Table of Contents 1
  • Preface 5
  • Introduction 9
  • Chapter I- Ethics of Values and the Person 19
  • Prefatory Remark 19
  • Chapter II- Phenomenological Intersubjectivity 81
  • Prefatory Remark 81
  • Chapter III- The Four Social Forms of Togetherness with Other Persons 99
  • Prefatory Remark 99
  • Chapter IV- Phenomenology of Religious Experience 121
  • Prefatory Remark 121
  • Chapter V- Ressentiment 143
  • Prefactory Remark 143
  • Prefatory Remark 167
  • Preface 167
  • Chapter VII- Subliminal Phenomenology 181
  • Prefatory Remark 181
  • Chapter VIII- The Forms of Knowledge and Society 193
  • Preface 193
  • Chapter IX- The Last Vision- The Becoming of God, of World, and the Cosmic Place of Human Existence Prefatory Remark 249
  • Bibliographies 299
  • Index of Proper Names 315
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