The Mind of Max Scheler: The First Comprehensive Guide Based on the Complete Works

By Manfred S. Frings | Go to book overview

CHAPTER VII
SUBLIMINAL PHENOMENOLOGY

Prefatory Remark

The phenomenology of Max Scheler has remained largely in the background of the phenomenological movement since World War II. Even today, no detailed study is available. There are two reasons for this. (1) The German Collected Edition of his works progressed slowly from 1954 while the fast growing phenomenological movement in Europe concentrated on Heidegger, Husserl, Merleau-Ponty and Sartre. International availability of their works had been promoted by the second generation of phenomenologists who had known them in person. This is especially true of the phenomenology of Husserl whose work was promoted by Van Breda and Cairns and, in their wake, by Gadamer, Gurwitsch, Spiegelberg, Landgrebe, Strauss, and other American and European scholars. (2) Scheler never offered a detailed presentation of his phenomenology, except in two essays from 1911 and 1914, "Lehre von den drei Tatsachen" and "Phänomenologie und Erkenntnistheorie" ( X377-502/PE 136-287).

Throughout his works, however, Scheler made numerous references to phenomenology and to the fledgling phenomenological movement in Göttingen and the part he played in it before and during World War I. A first discussion with Husserl ( VII, 307-11) who is often referred to as the "father" of phenomenology, occurred in 1901. It centered on the concepts of intuition (Anschauung) and perception. Scheler, who was fifteen years younger than Husserl, outlined to him his own novel concept of intuition. Scheler's explanation was that the scope of intuition extended beyond its possible sensible components and logical forms. Husserl in turn remarked that he too had come up with an analogous extension of intuition, probably referring to his categorial intuition of his Logische Untersuchungen ( 1900/ 01). Between 1910 and 1916 Husserl strongly recommended Scheler on various career opportunities. But by the end of World War I, the relationship had cooled remarkably and it remained that way. As a free lance-writer from 1910 to 1919, Scheler had an astonishing record of publications that spread his name quickly throughout Europe.

Although Scheler harbored severe reservations about Husserl's phenomenology, he acknowledged and praised him on occasion. This

-181-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Mind of Max Scheler: The First Comprehensive Guide Based on the Complete Works
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page *
  • Table of Contents 1
  • Preface 5
  • Introduction 9
  • Chapter I- Ethics of Values and the Person 19
  • Prefatory Remark 19
  • Chapter II- Phenomenological Intersubjectivity 81
  • Prefatory Remark 81
  • Chapter III- The Four Social Forms of Togetherness with Other Persons 99
  • Prefatory Remark 99
  • Chapter IV- Phenomenology of Religious Experience 121
  • Prefatory Remark 121
  • Chapter V- Ressentiment 143
  • Prefactory Remark 143
  • Prefatory Remark 167
  • Preface 167
  • Chapter VII- Subliminal Phenomenology 181
  • Prefatory Remark 181
  • Chapter VIII- The Forms of Knowledge and Society 193
  • Preface 193
  • Chapter IX- The Last Vision- The Becoming of God, of World, and the Cosmic Place of Human Existence Prefatory Remark 249
  • Bibliographies 299
  • Index of Proper Names 315
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 324

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.