VII -- MODERN INDUSTRY AND MANAGEMENT

By DEXTER S. KIMBALL


I

IGNORANCE is the chief source of fear. Men are always afraid of the things they do not understand be they people, books, machines, or changes in surrounding circumstances. Without doubt much of the criticism now being levelled at modern industry and management emanates from those who are not well informed concerning the nature and growth of science, pure and applied, and who find themselves in new and unfamiliar surroundings to which their old philosophies of life do not apply. It is difficult for many of them to adjust themselves in a world where personal service tends to disappear and as a consequence of which their physical comforts are disturbed. They are terrified at the speed of modern life where men fly like birds and where time and space have been obliterated by the telegraph, the telephone, the radio, and the steam engine. The philosopher is disturbed because many of the ancient theories of life do not apply to modern days. The theologian is worried because modern science has disproved his pet superstition. The artist is in despair because he sees new forms of industrial art appearing that are different. The poet, as yet, has found little in modern industry to inspire his song and the economist is perplexed to find his apparently bomb-proof axioms suddenly superseded by new and startling economic theories. Hence comes the flood of criticism, too great to be enumerated here, carrying the general implication that modern applied science, while undoubtedly conferring some higher degree of physical comfort and pleasure upon many, is destructive of much that is good to a degree

-137-

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Toward Civilization
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Preface v
  • Contents vii
  • Introduction 1
  • I- The New Age and the New Man 21
  • II- Science Lights the Torch 38
  • III- The Spirit of Invention in an Industrial Civilization 47
  • IV- Power 69
  • V- Transportation 98
  • VI- Communication 120
  • VII- Modern Industry and Management 137
  • VIII- Agriculture 159
  • IX- Engineering in Government 176
  • X- Art in the Market Place - The Industrial Arts in the Machine Age 196
  • XI- The Machine and Architecture 213
  • XII- Work and Leisure 232
  • III- Education and the New Age 253
  • XIV- Machine Industry and Idealism 273
  • XV- Spirit and Culture under the Machine 282
  • XVI- Summary- The Planning of Civilization 297
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