The Teamsters Union: A Study of Its Economic Impact

By Robert D. Leiter | Go to book overview

Chapter 11
THE UNION AND THE LAW

AN EXAMINATION OF American legislation discloses that only two statutes have been aimed at specific unions. One of these, the Hobbs law or Antiracketeering Act of 1946, amending the Copeland Antiracketeering Act of 1934, was directed primarily against the Teamsters Union. The other, the Lea Act or Anti-Petrillo law, also passed in 1946, was intended mainly to eliminate certain practices of the musicians union in the radio broadcasting industry. In each instance public opinion strongly supported the Congressional decision to check undesirable activity by the unions involved.

The Teamsters Union, an important component of the trucking industry, has been a party in the establishment of a substantial body of administrative and judicial law arising out of litigation under the Taft-Hartley Act.1 Although the most significant decisions have been concerned with secondary boycotts, other matters have received attention from the National Labor Relations Board. The Board has ruled, for example, in connection with representation cases, that a group of workers should be severed from a production and maintenance unit for an election to determine whether they want separate representation if the time spent in driving, supplemented by loading and unloading the trucks, preponderates over time spent in other duties.2 During the fiscal year of 1956, 28 of the 118 decisions rendered by the NLRB in which unions were respondents involved the teamsters. Of the 372 charges of secondary boycott violations filed

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