XII -- WORK AND LEISURE

By LILLIAN M. GILBRETH


I

AN ENGINEER is a person who believes in measurement, who knows how to measure, does measure, and is willing to abide by the results of this measurement, whether they suit his preconceived notions or not. It is necessary to state this at the outset of this discussion, because it explains his whole attitude toward work and leisure, and it is from this attitude that I approach the subject of this chapter. The engineer realizes distinctly that we have not yet found units, methods, and devices by which to measure intangibles as well as tangibles. This does not discourage him in trying to find such units, methods, and devices. He feels that by advocating and practising measurement he is not confining his field of interest to those things which can be measured, but simply that he is pledging himself to apply measurement to the things which can be measured, as far and as fast as he can, and at the same time to look for ways of measuring things which as yet do not submit themselves to any type of measurement that he knows.

This means that he is constitutionally and by training willing to submit his own activities to measurement, and that his answer to those who "indict" him as hampering mankind's advance toward civilization is "Let us measure."

This is no theoretical definition of an engineer and of the engineer's attitude. It is taken from no dictionary. It is derived from a study of the engineer's code of ethics, from a review of his training, from a first-hand knowledge not only of what he does

-232-

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Toward Civilization
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Preface v
  • Contents vii
  • Introduction 1
  • I- The New Age and the New Man 21
  • II- Science Lights the Torch 38
  • III- The Spirit of Invention in an Industrial Civilization 47
  • IV- Power 69
  • V- Transportation 98
  • VI- Communication 120
  • VII- Modern Industry and Management 137
  • VIII- Agriculture 159
  • IX- Engineering in Government 176
  • X- Art in the Market Place - The Industrial Arts in the Machine Age 196
  • XI- The Machine and Architecture 213
  • XII- Work and Leisure 232
  • III- Education and the New Age 253
  • XIV- Machine Industry and Idealism 273
  • XV- Spirit and Culture under the Machine 282
  • XVI- Summary- The Planning of Civilization 297
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