Music Matters: A New Philosophy of Music Education

By David J. Elliott | Go to book overview

Preface

This book examines the nature and significance of music and music education. Through the development of critical discussions and practical principles, it aims to construct a philosophical foundation for educating people toward the fullest understanding and enjoyment of music making and music listening.

The book unfolds in three parts. Part I probes past and present relationships between philosophy and music education. Part II builds a philosophy of music education based on a new way of thinking about the nature and significance of music: new in the sense that it provides new reasons to believe that music is one of the most consequential, dynamic, and practical pursuits in the human repertoire and, therefore, fundamental to the full development of the individual and the collective self. Part III proposes a new concept of music curriculum development for music teaching and learning.

Music Matters is primarily intended for senior undergraduate and graduate music education students and in-service music educators. I hope that it will encourage changes in the philosophy and practice of music education by serving as a catalyst for critical thinking and individual philosophy building. Indeed, this book offers a philosophy not in the popular but mistaken sense of a canon to live and die for, but as one possible view and, therefore, as a tool--as a means of initiating, stimulating, guiding, and supporting the efforts of music teachers (administrators, parents, and others) as they tackle the many theoretical and practical issues involved in music education. Moreover, it is my hope that this tool will be refined in the future with the help of those who use it to teach, learn, and reflect.

The motivation for this book is fourfold. First, I wish to contribute to the improvement of music teaching and learning. Second, I am discontent with conventional thinking; after studying and teaching the traditional philosophy of music education as aesthetic education for many years, I have become more and more convinced of its logical and practical flaws. Third, I have also become persuaded that a more analytic and contextual approach to the philosophical problems of music education, combined with insights from contemporary scholars in the philosophy of music, music cognition, education, and psychology, holds important opportunities to advance music teaching and learning. Fourth, having searched in vain for a text to meet my needs as a teacher of music education philosophy and foundations, I decided to write my own. In doing so, I have been encouraged by

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Music Matters: A New Philosophy of Music Education
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Preface vii
  • Acknowledgments ix
  • Contents xi
  • I - Introduction 1
  • 1 - Philosophy and Music Education 3
  • 2 - Toward a New Philosophy 18
  • II - Music and Music Education 47
  • 3 - Musicing 49
  • 4 - Music Listening 78
  • 5 - Musicers, Listeners, and Musical Values 109
  • 6 - Musical Works 137
  • 7 - Musicing in Context 161
  • 8 - Music Listening in Context 184
  • 9 - Musical Creativity in Context 215
  • III - Music Teaching and Learning 239
  • 10 - Music Education and Curriculum 241
  • 11 - Music Teaching and Learning 269
  • 12 - Music Education and Schooling 296
  • Notes 313
  • Bibliography 347
  • Author Index 363
  • Subject Index 367
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