Music Matters: A New Philosophy of Music Education

By David J. Elliott | Go to book overview

8
Music Listening in Context

The philosophy propounded in this book has proposed that intelligent music listening consists in deliberate acts of informed thinking in relation to performed or improvised patterns of musical design that, in turn, evince histories and norms of musical practice. In addition, and depending on the musical work and practice involved, intelligent music listening may also involve the cognition of musical expressions of emotion and/or musical representations.

In this chapter I propose that since all forms of musicing are inherently artistic- social-cultural endeavors, and since musical works are social-cultural constructions, and since listeners live in specific times and places, music listening also involves the cognition of cultural-ideological information. Put another way, musical works both constitute and are constituted by culture-specific beliefs and values (tacit and verbal).

The idea that music listening and musical works are inseparable from social realities is not original to this book. Plato's concern for the ethical aspects of musical practices is a strong precedent. In our own time, studies of music from the perspectives of ethnomusicology, anthropology, sociology, feminism, semiotics, and analytic philosophy have brought us to a deeper understanding of the ways in which culture and ideology mediate music making and music listening.


1. Orientation

In the aesthetic view, "good" music is that which rises above the nitty-gritty of everyday life; good music transcends its own time and place. All music ought to be listened to aesthetically to ensure that the presented form will be responded to in and of itself and not as any kind of "generalized, communicated information." 1 Reimer articulates the aesthetic doctrine: "[T]he better the work of art, the more it transcends its time of creation and is relevant to human experience in general. . . . The notion that art works should be regarded as "an expression of their time"

-184-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Music Matters: A New Philosophy of Music Education
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Preface vii
  • Acknowledgments ix
  • Contents xi
  • I - Introduction 1
  • 1 - Philosophy and Music Education 3
  • 2 - Toward a New Philosophy 18
  • II - Music and Music Education 47
  • 3 - Musicing 49
  • 4 - Music Listening 78
  • 5 - Musicers, Listeners, and Musical Values 109
  • 6 - Musical Works 137
  • 7 - Musicing in Context 161
  • 8 - Music Listening in Context 184
  • 9 - Musical Creativity in Context 215
  • III - Music Teaching and Learning 239
  • 10 - Music Education and Curriculum 241
  • 11 - Music Teaching and Learning 269
  • 12 - Music Education and Schooling 296
  • Notes 313
  • Bibliography 347
  • Author Index 363
  • Subject Index 367
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 386

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

    Already a member? Log in now.