The World of the Autistic Child: Understanding and Treating Autistic Spectrum Disorders

By Bryna Siegel | Go to book overview

Acknowledgments

This book is actually a joint effort. It reflects what I have learned--and what I've been taught--by the autistic children and their families with whom I have interacted over the past twelve years. Without them, I would not have known what to write. What is written here is a reflection of all the impressions that have been made upon me by many, many children with autism and PDD, their caring and loving parents, wonderfully creative special education teachers, amazingly dedicated caseworkers, and other supportive therapists out to do their best, usually with limited resources.

I gratefully acknowledge the enthusiasm, commitment, and skill of the various colleagues, staff, and trainees (past and present) of the PDD Clinic here at the University of California, San Francisco, Langley Porter Psychiatric Institute, as well as those who worked with me at our first PDD Clinic at Stanford University's Division of Child Psychiatry and Child Development. I would particularly like to thank Dr. Sharadha Raghavan and Dr. Jelena Vukicevic for their dedication during our time together. Most central has been my collegiality with Dr. Glen Elliott, my close collaborator and friend for the past twelve years. At the time of this writing, our clinic has just completed assessing (and hopefully helping) just over 1,400 children with autism, PDD, and related problems. The efforts of all those involved in the PDD Clinic have been monumental. Of those who have been part of our clinic and research lab at Langley Porter, I would particularly like to thank Stephen Sheinkopf, Dr. Runa Lindblom, Dr. Anna-Marie Van Elberg, Karen Rabin, Leta Huang, Dr. Karen Biskup-Meyer, Dr. Eun Hee Park, Suzanne Pemberton, and Wendy Shapera. I have learned a great deal through collaborations and discussions with colleagues at other universities, beginning with the late Dr. Roland Ciaranello, Dr. Adrianna Schuler, Dr. Ivar Lovaas, Dr. Ed Ritvo, Dr. B. J. Freeman, Dr. Robert Spitzer, Dr. Fred Volkmar, Dr. Catherine Lord, Dr. Peter Szatmari, Dr. Sue Smalley, and Hillary Stubblefield.

-ix-

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