Knowledge-Driven Work: Unexpected Lessons from Japanese and United States Work Practices

By Joel Cutcher-Gershenfeld; Wen-Jeng Lin et al. | Go to book overview

Japan Business and Economics Series
This series provides a forum for empirical and theoretical work on Japanese business enterprise, Japanese management practices, and the Japanese economy. Japan continues to grow as a major economic world power, and Japanese companies create products and deliver services that compete successfully with those of the best firms around the world. Much can be learned from an understanding of how this has been accomplished and how it is being sustained.The series aims to balance empirical and theoretical work, always in search of a deeper understanding of the Japanese phenomenon. It also implicitly takes for granted that there are significant differences between Japan and other countries and that these differences are worth knowing about. The series editors expect books published in the series to present a broad range of work on social, cultural, economic, and political institutions. If, as some have predicted, the twenty-first century sees the rise of Asia as the largest economic region in the world, the rest of the world needs to understand the country that is, and will continue to be, one of the major players in this region.
Editorial Board
Jenny Corbett University of Oxford
Mark Fruin University of Michigan Coordinating Editor
Tsuneo Ishikawa University of Tokyo
Tadao Kagano Kobe University
Fumio Kodama Research Center for Advanced Science and Technology
Hiroyuki Odagiri University of Tsukuba
Masahiro Okuno-Fujiwara University of Tokyo
Hugh Patrick Columbia University
Eleanor Westney Massachusetts Institute of Technology

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Knowledge-Driven Work: Unexpected Lessons from Japanese and United States Work Practices
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Editorial Board i
  • Editorial Board i
  • Japan Business and Economics Series ii
  • Title Page iii
  • Foreword vii
  • Preface xi
  • Acknowledgments xiii
  • Contents xvii
  • 1 - Details Matter 3
  • 2 - Initial Visits to Japanese Factories 18
  • 3 - Cross-Cultural Diffusion 36
  • 4 - Team-Based Work Systems 59
  • 5 - Employee Involvement and Kaizen 71
  • 6 - Constructing Employment Security 88
  • 7 - Human Resource Management and Knowledge-Driven Work Systems 109
  • 8 - Labor Relations 130
  • 9 - Implications 150
  • Notes 163
  • Index 179
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