Knowledge-Driven Work: Unexpected Lessons from Japanese and United States Work Practices

By Joel Cutcher-Gershenfeld; Wen-Jeng Lin et al. | Go to book overview

7
Human Resource Management and Knowledge-Driven Work Systems

Introduction

For most of this century, workers were hired to be a pair of hands to serve a machine. The tasks and goals of what were then referred to as personnel managers were fundamentally different. Under the mass production model, employees were screened for health and ability to withstand the labor of the assembly line. Technical skills were important for a small group of workers involved in craftwork such as die making and pipe fitting. This same logic reached beyond the factories to office and retail settings.

Employee knowledge under the mass production model was valued only where there was clear expertise. Craft-based knowledge, for example, allowed skilled trades workers to bargain as a special case in contract negotiations, while workers with assembly line experience were viewed by most managers as interchangeable parts throughout the industry. High levels of turnover meant that personnel officers were primarily in the business of finding a steady stream of new hands. A worker's time was in effect rented, and an employee's standing with the company was seen as a short-term exchange rather than a long-term relationship.

Knowledge-driven work requires more than a worker's hands. The person must be engaged to think and participate in his or her tasks. Human resource departments must focus on hiring not just technical experts but people at all levels with skills that facilitate team work and participative activities. There is a need for people with flexibility and a

-109-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Knowledge-Driven Work: Unexpected Lessons from Japanese and United States Work Practices
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Editorial Board i
  • Editorial Board i
  • Japan Business and Economics Series ii
  • Title Page iii
  • Foreword vii
  • Preface xi
  • Acknowledgments xiii
  • Contents xvii
  • 1 - Details Matter 3
  • 2 - Initial Visits to Japanese Factories 18
  • 3 - Cross-Cultural Diffusion 36
  • 4 - Team-Based Work Systems 59
  • 5 - Employee Involvement and Kaizen 71
  • 6 - Constructing Employment Security 88
  • 7 - Human Resource Management and Knowledge-Driven Work Systems 109
  • 8 - Labor Relations 130
  • 9 - Implications 150
  • Notes 163
  • Index 179
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 192

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.