Japanese Corporate Philanthropy

By Nancy R. London | Go to book overview

Japan As a Middle-Class Society

Another element impeding the growth of the third sector in Japan is the widespread disbelief among Japanese in Japan's current wealth. "Only recently have the Japanese begun . . . to accept the reality that they are not so poor as they used to believe," noted Mr. Osamu Muro, an expert on Third World nongovernmental aid. 25 Even though Japan is now reputed to have more billionaires (per capita) than the United States has and is the home of many of the world's largest companies, the Japanese persist in seeing themselves as solidly middle class and are fond of saying that Japan is a rich country full of poor people.

Undoubtedly the accumulation of large personal and industrial fortunes has contributed to the growth of Japanese philanthropy since the 1960s, much as it did in the United States at the turn of the century, but not as much as it might have if that wealth were generally acknowledged. With respect to individuals, studies conducted in the United States indicate that it is both wealthy people and people who perceive themselves as having sufficient discretionary, disposable income who are the most generous contributors to charitable causes.

A study commissioned by the Rockefeller Brothers Fund and conducted by the Independent Sector in 1986 found that at all income levels, those who believed that they had discretionary income gave more generously to charity than did those who did not. The study further found that those who reported they had little or no worry about money needs in the future were also more generous contributors. 26 Both of these observations have implications for giving in Japan where -- due to the high price of land and housing and the absence of a social security system to defray the costs of retirement -- most Japanese save assiduously, do not feel they have large amounts of discretionary income, and worry greatly about their financial reserves for the future.


Notes
1.
Yujiro Hayashi, "Toward Japanese Philanthropy," quoted in The Future of Private Grant-Making Foundations, Proceedings of the Tenth- Anniversary International Symposium of the Toyota Foundation ( Tokyo: Toyota Foundation, 1985), p. 62.

-20-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Japanese Corporate Philanthropy
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Preface vii
  • Acknowledgments ix
  • Contents xi
  • 1 - Introduction 3
  • Notes 8
  • 2 - Themes and Corollaries 10
  • Notes 20
  • 3 - The Development of the Nonprofit System 24
  • Notes 32
  • 4 - Establishing a Foundation Law and Practice 36
  • Notes 58
  • 5 - Taxation 66
  • Notes 90
  • 6 - The Philanthropic Process -- Management, Operation, and Grant Making 99
  • Notes 119
  • 7 - Recent Developments and Future Directions 123
  • Notes 129
  • Index 133
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 150

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.