Japanese Corporate Philanthropy

By Nancy R. London | Go to book overview

7
Recent Developments
and Future Directions

In the preceding chapters I have attempted to illustrate and support the contention that even when extending beyond the borders of Japan, Japanese philanthropy functions largely within the confines of a unique domestic culture and cannot correctly be understood without reference to that context. Everything from attitudes toward and perceptions of philanthropy, as reflected in governing laws, to the apparatus for raising funds and awarding grants reflects traces of Japanese history and culture. History is continually progressing and culture perpetually evolving; accordingly, philanthropy cannot remain static. Japanese philanthropy is not likely to metamorphose dramatically to reappear suddenly in altered form. It is not likely ever to duplicate the American model. Nonetheless, it has grown and continues to grow into an increasingly sophisticated and effective shape of its own. The final pages of this book briefly examine recent trends and potential future directions in Japanese corporate philanthropy.

As we mentioned earlier, Japanese corporate philanthropy is largely a product of the 1960s. During this period, the growth of corporate international philanthropy was perhaps the most rapid. It is estimated that Japanese donors have contributed over ¥29 billion ($200 million) to foreign organizations since 1975. 1 Moreover, according to a survey by the JCIE in 1985, the rate of growth of direct corporate contributions for international purposes (i.e., contributions not made through separately established corporate foundations) has far exceeded the rate of growth for domestic contributions. In addition to direct corporate contributions, Japanese

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Japanese Corporate Philanthropy
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Preface vii
  • Acknowledgments ix
  • Contents xi
  • 1 - Introduction 3
  • Notes 8
  • 2 - Themes and Corollaries 10
  • Notes 20
  • 3 - The Development of the Nonprofit System 24
  • Notes 32
  • 4 - Establishing a Foundation Law and Practice 36
  • Notes 58
  • 5 - Taxation 66
  • Notes 90
  • 6 - The Philanthropic Process -- Management, Operation, and Grant Making 99
  • Notes 119
  • 7 - Recent Developments and Future Directions 123
  • Notes 129
  • Index 133
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